Scottish National Identity

Scottish national identity is a term referring to the sense of national identity and common culture of Scottish people and is shared by a considerable majority of the people of Scotland.

Scottish national identity is largely free from ethnic distinction, and many of "immigrant" descent see themselves (and are seen as), for example, Pakistani and Scottish: Asian-Scots. Identification of others as Scottish is generally a matter of accent, and though the various dialects of the Scots language and Scottish English (or the accents of Gaelic speakers) are distinctive, people associate them all together as Scottish with a shared identity, as well as a regional or local identity. Parts of Scotland, like Glasgow, the Outer Hebrides, the north east of Scotland (including Aberdeen), and the Scottish Borders retain a strong sense of regional identity, alongside the idea of a Scottish national identity. Residents of Orkney and Shetland also express a distinct regional identity, influenced by their Norse heritage. However many other regions of Scotland, such as the Western Isles and Caithness, also have a Norse heritage.

Read more about Scottish National Identity:  Cultural Icons

Other articles related to "scottish national identity, national, scottish, national identity":

Scottish National Identity - Cultural Icons
... the first national instrument was the Clarsach or Celtic harp until it was replaced by the Highland pipes in the 15th century ... Scott, very much a Unionist and Tory, was at the same time a great populariser of Scottish mythology through his writings ...
Scottish Society
... Scottish national identity is a term referring to the sense of national identity and common culture of Scottish people and is shared by a considerable majority of the people of Scotland ... Scottish national identity is largely free from ethnic distinction, and many of "immigrant" descent see themselves (and are seen as), for example, Pakistani and Scottish Asian-Scots ... Identification of others as Scottish is generally a matter of accent, and though the various dialects of the Scots language and Scottish English (or the accents of Gaelic speakers) are ...
German Unity Day - History of The National Holiday in Germany - Attempt To Change The Date of National Holiday
... Instead of October 3, the National Reunification should be celebrated on the first Sunday of October ... hours would be seen as a provocation and devaluing the national holiday ... October, which happens to have been the national day of East Germany this date would thus have been seen as commemorating the division of Germany rather than the reunification ...
Zdravljica
... the Slovene Romantic poet France PreŇ°eren, considered the national poet of Slovenes ... On 27 September 1989, it became the national anthem of Slovenia ... of the idea of a united Slovenia, which the March Revolution in 1848 elevated into a national political programme ...
Orienteering - Governing Bodies - National
... These national bodies are the rule-making body for that nation ... For example the British Orienteering Federation is the national governing body for the United Kingdom ...

Famous quotes containing the words identity, scottish and/or national:

    Unlike Boswell, whose Journals record a long and unrewarded search for a self, Johnson possessed a formidable one. His life in London—he arrived twenty-five years earlier than Boswell—turned out to be a long defense of the values of Augustan humanism against the pressures of other possibilities. In contrast to Boswell, Johnson possesses an identity not because he has gone in search of one, but because of his allegiance to a set of assumptions that he regards as objectively true.
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    In really hard times the rules of the game are altered. The inchoate mass begins to stir. It becomes potent, and when it strikes,... it strikes with incredible emphasis. Those are the rare occasions when a national will emerges from the scattered, specialized, or indifferent blocs of voters who ordinarily elect the politicians. Those are for good or evil the great occasions in a nation’s history.
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