Scott Masters

Scott Masters is a Jewish gay pornographic film director and studio owner active in adult film since the mid-1960s.

Masters, whose real name is Warren Stephens, used the nom-de-porn "Robert Walters" when he founded Nova Studios. He later shuttered Nova Studio and became head of production at Catalina Video. In 1992, he co-founded gay adult film studio Studio 2000 with director John Travis. In 2006, Masters sold Studio 2000 to former Falcon Entertainment consultant David McKay and financier Trace Wendell. Among the adult film industry Masters is sometimes known as "Ribzy" following a string of false accusations that he had undergone rib removal surgery to facilitate oral self-gratification, however, such rumors were largely untrue.

Read more about Scott Masters:  Early Years, Feature Film Career, Nova Studios, Catalina Years, Studio 2000

Other articles related to "scott masters, masters":

Studio 2000 - History - Scott Masters
... Scott Masters is a gay pornographic film director and studio owner active in adult film since the mid-1960s ... Masters, whose real name is Warren Stephens, used the nom-de-porn "Robert Walters" when he founded Nova Studios ...
Scott Masters - Studio 2000
... In 1992, Masters left Catalina ... Masters announced his retirement in 1999 ... During the 14 years in which Masters co-owned Studio 2000, the studio won numerous awards at the Grabbys, Gay Erotic Video Awards, and GayVN Awards ...

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