Scientific Work Place

Scientific Work Place

Scientific WorkPlace (often abbreviated to SWP) is a software package for scientific word processing on Microsoft Windows. It is shipped as a WYSIWYG LaTeX-based word processor, together with the LaTeX document preparation system and an optional computer algebra system.

Scientific WorkPlace allows one to edit and typeset mathematical and scientific text using the WYSIWYM paradigm. All formula layout and entering of special characters can be done by either mouse or via keyboard shortcuts. As the user edits, they see the document presented in a formatted and typeset form.

Documents are stored in LaTeX format and can be typeset using any LaTeX processor to obtain typeset pages. Scientific Workplace comes with the TrueTex implementation of LaTeX and pdfTeX.

In this way SWP provides the high quality of LaTeX typesetting without requiring users to learn the LaTeX language.

Scientific WorkPlace includes a built-in computer algebra system (Maple in earlier versions and/or MuPAD in later versions) with which one can perform computations and generate plots from inside the editor.

Many document shells (i.e., templates) are included to meet the typesetting styles of specific professional journals and institutions. These shells use the corresponding LaTeX style files.

Subsets of these capabilities are available as Scientific Word (no computer algebra) and Scientific Notebook (limited LaTeX import/export, no LaTeX typesetter included).

Scientific WorkPlace combines the ease of entering and editing mathematics in mathematical notation with the ability to compute and plot with the built-in computer algebra engine. In this integrated working environment, the user can enter mathematics and perform computations without having to think or work in a programming language.

Read more about Scientific Work Place:  Additional Features, See Also

Other articles related to "scientific, work, works, scientific work place":

Kenneth Lee Pike - Work
... while investigators from outside the linguistic group apply scientific methods in the analysis of language, producing etic descriptions which are verifiable and reproducible ... of a language unknown to him would be brought in to work with Pike ... He pointed out that sometimes he did more of the work of a horse, other times he did more of the work of a donkey, but he was always both (Headland 2001508) ...
Georgius Agricola - De Re Metallica
... His most famous work, the De re metallica libri xii long remained a standard work, and marks its author as one of the most accomplished chemists of his time ... The work is a complete and systematic treatise on mining and extractive metallurgy, illustrated with many fine and interesting woodcuts which illustrate every conceivable process to extract ores from the ... Until that time, Pliny's work Historia Naturalis was the main source of information on metals and mining techniques, and Agricola made numerous references to ...
Georgius Agricola - Life and Work
... and was chosen as town physician at Joachimsthal, a centre of mining and smelting works, his object being partly "to fill in the gaps in the art of healing", and partly to test what had been written ... Bermannus, sive de re metallica dialogus, (1530) the first attempt to reduce to scientific order the knowledge won by practical work, brought Agricola into notice it contained an approving letter from Erasmus at the ... theological and historical subjects, his chief historical work being the Dominatores Saxonici a prima origine ad hanc aetatem, published at Freiberg ...
Work - Name
... Weorc or Work (Anglo-Saxon leader), who gave his name to Workington or 'Weorc-inga-tun', meaning the 'tun' (settlement) of the 'Weorcingas' (the people ...
Scientific Work Place - See Also
... TeXmacs - An open source cross-platform scientific word processor wxMaxima - An open source cross-platform CAS that can be used with LyX Comparison of TeX ...

Famous quotes containing the words place, scientific and/or work:

    Meet me in St. Louis, Louis,
    Meet me at the fair,
    Don’t tell me the lights are shining any place but there.
    Andrew B. Sterling (1874–1955)

    I am not afraid of the priests in the long-run. Scientific method is the white ant which will slowly but surely destroy their fortifications. And the importance of scientific method in modern practical life—always growing and increasing—is the guarantee for the gradual emancipation of the ignorant upper and lower classes, the former of whom especially are the strength of the priests.
    Thomas Henry Huxley (1825–95)

    How marvellous it all is! Built not by saints and angels, but the work of men’s hands; cemented with men’s honest blood and with a world of tears, welded by the best brains of centuries past; not without the taint and reproach incidental to all human work, but constructed on the whole with pure and splendid purpose. Human, and yet not wholly human—for the most heedless and the most cynical must see the finger of the Divine.
    Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl Rosebery (1847–1929)