School - School Security

School Security

The safety of staff and students is increasingly becoming an issue for school communities, an issue most schools are addressing through improved security. After mass shootings such as the Columbine High School massacre and the Virginia Tech incident, many school administrators in the United States have created plans to protect students and staff in the event of a school shooting. Some have also taken measures such as installing metal detectors or video surveillance. Others have even taken measures such as having the children swipe identification cards as they board the school bus. For some schools, these plans have included the use of door numbering to aid public safety response.

Other security concerns faced by schools include bomb threats, gangs, vandalism, and bullying.

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Other articles related to "school security, schools, security, school":

Columbine High School Massacre - Impact On School Policies - School Security
... Following the Columbine shooting, schools across the United States instituted new security measures such as see-through backpacks, metal detectors, and ... Some schools implemented school door numbering to improve public safety response ... Several schools throughout the country resorted to requiring students to wear computer-generated IDs ...
Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office (Florida) - School Security
... deputy is stationed at every public middle and high school in Hillsborough County ... These deputies are known as School Resource Officers (SRO's) and work to become familiar with the students at their school ...

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