Saturday Night Live Sketches

Saturday Night Live Sketches

The following is a list of recurring Saturday Night Live sketches, organized by the season and date in which the sketch first appeared.

For an alphabetical list, see Recurring Saturday Night Live characters and sketches (listed alphabetically).

Season: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38

Read more about Saturday Night Live Sketches:  1975–1976, 1976–1977, 1977–1978, 1978–1979, 1979–1980, 1980–1981, 1981–1982, 1982–1983, 1983–1984, 1984–1985, 1985–1986, 1986–1987, 1987–1988, 1988–1989, 1989–1990, 1990–1991, 1991–1992, 1992–1993, 1993–1994, 1994–1995, 1995–1996, 1996–1997, 1997–1998, 1998–1999, 1999–2000, 2000–2001, 2001–2002, 2002–2003, 2003–2004, 2004–2005, 2005–2006, 2006–2007, 2007–2008, 2008–2009, 2009–2010, 2010–2011, 2011–2012, 2012–2013

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Saturday Night Live Sketches - 2012–2013
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Famous quotes containing the words saturday night, sketches, live, saturday and/or night:

    Saturday night is the loneliest night in the week.
    Sammy Cahn (1913–1993)

    Monday’s child is fair in face,
    Tuesday’s child is full of grace,
    Wednesday’s child is full of woe,
    Thursday’s child has far to go,
    Friday’s child is loving and giving,
    Saturday’s child works hard for its living;
    And a child that is born on a Christmas day,
    Is fair and wise, good and gay.
    Anonymous. Quoted in Traditions, Legends, Superstitions, and Sketches of Devonshire, vol. 2, ed. Anna E.K.S. Bray (1838)

    Those who do not know how to live must make a merit of dying.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    The return of the asymmetrical Saturday was one of those small events that were interior, local, almost civic and which, in tranquil lives and closed societies, create a sort of national bond and become the favorite theme of conversation, of jokes and of stories exaggerated with pleasure: it would have been a ready- made seed for a legendary cycle, had any of us leanings toward the epic.
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)

    Haven’t you heard, though,
    About the ships where war has found them out
    At sea, about the towns where war has come
    Through opening clouds at night with droning speed
    Further o’erhead than all but stars and angels
    And children in the ships and in the towns?
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)