Saratoga Race Course

Saratoga Race Course is a Thoroughbred horse racing track in Saratoga Springs, New York, United States. It opened on August 3, 1863, and is the oldest organized sporting venue of any kind in the United States. It is typically open for racing from late July through early September.

Read more about Saratoga Race Course:  History, Physical Attributes, Racing, Burials, TV Personalities, In Fiction

Other articles related to "saratoga, race, saratoga race course, race course, races":

List Of War Cry Concert Tours - ¿Dónde Está La Luz? Tour
... Rider, Transfer, Icarian Sep–Nov 2005 Autumn tour 12 With Saratoga, Freak Kitchen, Dark Tranquillity, Barón Rojo, To/Die/For, Hamlet Jan–Mar 2006 Winter tour 4 With Kannon, Valdemar, Saratoga, Soziedad ...
Saratoga Handicap
... The Saratoga Handicap was an American Thoroughbred horse race run annually at the Saratoga Race Course in Saratoga Springs, New York ...
Stephanie Elam - Background
... She grew up in Saratoga, California and attended Saratoga High School ... After graduating from Saratoga High School, Elam moved to Washington D.C ...
Saratoga Race Course - In Fiction
... The Race Course is the setting of a scene early on in the Ian Fleming James Bond novel Diamonds Are Forever where the mob he is trying to infiltrate attempt to use a fixed ... Saratoga is also referenced in Carly Simon's 1972 #1 hit, "You're So Vain." The line "I hear you went up to Saratoga and your horse naturally won," refers to the Saratoga Race Course ...
Lavelle Ensor
... talent, in 1918 he won a number of important races including the Coaching Club American Oaks, Saratoga Special Stakes and the Potomac Handicap when it was held at Laurel Park Racecourse ... Within two years he had twice won five races on a single day and in 1920 he led all American jockeys with a 31% winning percentage ... Bennett (1902–1976) and made their home in Saratoga Springs, New York ...

Famous quotes containing the word race:

    What is all wisdom save a collection of platitudes? Take fifty of our current proverbial sayings—they are so trite, so threadbare, that we can hardly bring our lips to utter them. None the less they embody the concentrated experience of the race and the man who orders his life according to their teaching cannot go far wrong.
    Norman Douglas (1868–1952)