Sarah Watt

Sarah Ann Watt (30 August 1958 – 4 November 2011) was an Australian film director.

Born in Sydney, Watt completed a Graduate Diploma of Film and Television (Animation) at the Swinburne Film and Television School (now VCA), Melbourne in 1990. Her student film "Catch of the Day" was to reflect the style of future work. In 1995, she directed a short film, Small Treasures, which won Best Short Film at the Venice Film Festival. In 2000, she made a program for the SBS series Swim Between the Flags. She received the Australian Film Institute's award for Best Director for her 2005 film Look Both Ways.

Watt returned to the VCA School of Film and Television to teach animation and was to assist in the development of many animators including Academy Award winner Adam Eliot in 1996. Watt was instrumental in the development of scripts for all of her students, but left the School to further develop her own projects, returning on occasion as a script and final production assessor.

During the post-production of Look Both Ways, Watt was diagnosed with cancer. Her second film My Year Without Sex was released in 2009.

She died on 4 November 2011 after suffering for six years with breast and bone cancer, aged 53.

Sarah Watt was married to actor William McInnes. They had two children, Clem (b.1993) and Stella (b.1998).

Famous quotes containing the words watt and/or sarah:

    Herein is the explanation of the analogies, which exist in all the arts. They are the re-appearance of one mind, working in many materials to many temporary ends. Raphael paints wisdom, Handel sings it, Phidias carves it, Shakspeare writes it, Wren builds it, Columbus sails it, Luther preaches it, Washington arms it, Watt mechanizes it. Painting was called “silent poetry,” and poetry “speaking painting.” The laws of each art are convertible into the laws of every other.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

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    Anne C. Weisberg (20th century)