Sakshigopal Temple - Origin of The Temple

Origin of The Temple

It is said that a poor young man of the village, which was named as Sakhigopal later, fell in love with the daughter of the village headman. However being of a higher economical status the headman opposed marriage between this young man and his daughter. The villagers went on a pilgrimage to Kashi including the headman and the young man. The village headman fell ill and was abandoned by fellow villagers. The young man tended to him so well that he soon got well and in gratitude promised his daughter in marriage to the young man. As soon as they returned to the village the headman went back on his promise asking the young man to produce a witness in support of his claim.

Lord Gopal impressed by the young man's devotion agreed to come and bear witness to the promise on one condition that the young man lead the way and he would follow, but the young man must never look back. He led the way to the Lord but near the village was a mound of sand on which as they passed, the man could not hear the Lord's footsteps and turned back. Immediately the Lord turned into a statue of stone rooted to the spot. The villagers were however so impressed that God himself came to back the young man's claim that the youngsters were married off and appointed as the first priests of the temple built in honor of Lord Gopal who came to bear witness known in Sanskrit as Sakshi.

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