Russ Prize

Russ Prize

The Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize is an American national and international award established by the United States National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in October 1999 in Athens, Ohio. Named after Fritz Russ, the founder of Systems Research Laboratories, and his wife Dolores Russ, it recognizes engineering achievement that "has had a significant impact on society and has contributed to the advancement of the human condition through widespread use." The award was instigated at the request of Ohio University to honor Fritz Russ, one of its alumni.

The first Russ Prize was awarded to two people, Earl E. Bakken and Wilson Greatbatch, in 2001. Since then, the prize has been awarded to one person every two years. The most recent recipient, in January 2011, was Leroy E. Hood, who received the award for his research on fundamental biology. Only living persons may receive the prize and recipients of the Charles Stark Draper Prize are not eligible for the Russ Prize. Members of the NAE, as well as non-members worldwide are able to receive the award.

The winners are presented during the National Engineers Week in February and receive US$500,000, a gold medallion and a hand-scribed certificate. The Russ Prize, the Gordon Prize and the Draper Prize, all awarded by the NAE, are known collectively as the "Nobel Prizes of Engineering".

Read more about Russ Prize:  Recipients

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National Academy Of Engineering - Major Prizes - Russ Prize
... Russ Prize is an American national and international award established by the NAE in October 1999 in Athens, Ohio ... Named after Fritz Russ, the founder of Systems Research Laboratories, and his wife Dolores Russ, it recognizes engineering achievement that "has had a ...

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