Royal Society Prizes

Some articles on society, prize, royal society:

Basque People - Culture - Society
... Historically, Basque society can be described as being somewhat at odds with Roman and later Western European societal norms ...
Society For Psychical Research - Today
... The Society is run by a President and a Council of twenty members, and is open to interested members of the public to join ... It publishes the peer reviewed quarterly Journal of the Society for Psychical Research (JSPR), the irregular Proceedings and the magazine Paranormal Review ... and many prominent sceptics have been active members of the Society ...
Illithid - Society
... Since the Elder Brain contains the essence of every illithid that died in its community, it functions in part as a vast library of knowledge that a mind flayer can call upon with a simple telepathic call ... The Elder Brain in turn can communicate telepathically with anyone in its community, issuing orders and ensuring everyone conforms ...
Horrible Science - Awards
... thrilled to have won it." Winner of the Junior Aventis Science Book Prize 2004 for Really Rotten Experiments Winner of the Rhône-Poulenc Junior Science Book Prize 1997 for ...
Robert Hooke - Life and Works - Royal Society
... The Royal Society was founded in 1660, and in April 1661 the society debated a short tract on the rising of water in slender glass pipes, in which Hooke reported that the height water rose was related to the ... Moray proposed that a Curator be appointed to furnish the society with Experiments, and this was unanimously passed with Hooke being named ... Boyle for releasing him to the Society's employment ...

Famous quotes containing the words prizes, royal and/or society:

    She prizes not such trifles as these are.
    The gifts she looks from me are packed and locked
    Up in my heart, which I have given already,
    But not delivered.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    An Englishman, methinks,—not to speak of other European nations,—habitually regards himself merely as a constituent part of the English nation; he is a member of the royal regiment of Englishmen, and is proud of his company, as he has reason to be proud of it. But an American—one who has made tolerable use of his opportunities—cares, comparatively, little about such things, and is advantageously nearer to the primitive and the ultimate condition of man in these respects.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Before abstraction everything is one, but one like chaos; after abstraction everything is united again, but this union is a free binding of autonomous, self-determined beings. Out of a mob a society has developed, chaos has been transformed into a manifold world.
    Novalis [Friedrich Von Hardenberg] (1772–1801)