Royal Rumble (1999)

Royal Rumble (1999) was the twelfth annual Royal Rumble professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). It took place on January 24, 1999 at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim, California. The title of the event was taken from a promise by Mr. McMahon that the first entrant in the Royal Rumble, Steve Austin, had "no chance in hell" of winning the match. The theme song for the event, based on the phrase, would go on to become the entrance music for McMahon's stable The Corporation and later, just McMahon himself, which he uses to this day.

The main event was the annual Royal Rumble match, which saw the winner receive a title shot for the WWF Championship at the WrestleMania pay-per-view two months later. The Royal Rumble centered around the continuing heated rivalry between Steve Austin and Mr. McMahon, with those men entering the main event at #1 and #2, respectively. The penultimate match for the WWF Championship was an "I Quit" match between Mankind and The Rock, which is remembered both for its brutality and its place in the documentary film Beyond the Mat. Lower down on the card the WWF Intercontinental Championship and WWF Women's Championship were both defended.

Read more about Royal Rumble (1999):  Background, Event, Aftermath, Results

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