Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (Training Branch)

The Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (Training Branch), often abbreviated to RAFVR(T) is a voluntary element of the British Royal Air Force specifically appointed in a training role within the RAFVR. Members of the RAFVR(T) have no call-up liability and often operate part time on Air Experience Flights, Volunteer Gliding Squadrons, or more commonly in the local structure of the Air Cadet Organisation - either the RAF Sections of the Combined Cadet Force (CCF), or the Air Training Corps (ATC).

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Famous quotes containing the words reserve, volunteer, royal, air and/or force:

    We must reserve a back shop all our own, entirely free, in which to establish our real liberty and our principal retreat and solitude.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)

    We should have an army so organized and so officered as to be capable in time of emergency, in cooperation with the National Militia, and under the provision of a proper national volunteer law, rapidly to expand into a force sufficient to resist all probable invasion from abroad and to furnish a respectable expeditionary force if necessary in the maintenance of our traditional American policy which bears the name of President Monroe.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)

    High on a throne of royal state, which far
    Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind,
    Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand
    Show’rs on her kings barbaric pearl and gold,
    Satan exalted sat, by merit raised
    To that bad eminence; and, from despair
    Thus high uplifted beyond hope, aspires
    Beyond thus high, insatiate to pursue
    Vain war with Heav’n, and by success untaught,
    His proud imaginations
    John Milton (1608–1674)

    The air is precious to the red man, for all things share the same breath—the beast, the tree, the man, they all share the same breath. The white man does not seem to notice the air he breathes. Like a man dying for many days, he is numb to the stench.
    Attributed to Seattle (c. 1784–1866)

    Americans have internalized the value that mothers of young children should be mothers first and foremost, and not paid workers. The result is that a substantial amount of confusion, ambivalence, guilt, and anxiety is experienced by working mothers. Our cultural expectations of mother and realities of female participation in the labor force are directly contradictory.
    Ruth E. Zambrana, U.S. researcher, M. Hurst, and R.L. Hite. “The Working Mother in Contemporary Perspectives: A Review of Literature,” Pediatrics (December 1979)