Roger Brown (defensive Tackle) - Football Career

Football Career

Brown was drafted in the 4th round, 42nd overall, in the 1960 NFL Draft out of Maryland Eastern Shore by the Detroit Lions. Played in the College All-star game in Chicago vs the Baltimore Colts. Played with the original fearsome foursome, with Alex Karras, Sam Williams and Darris McCord, He was named the 1962 Outstanding Defensive Lineman in the league, and sacked both Bart Starr and Johnny Unitas for safeties. Tying an individual NFL record for safeties scored in a single season; first set in 1932. He played for the Lions through the 1966 season, then was traded to the Los Angeles Rams. Was known for his performance in the "Thanksgiving Day Massacre" game against the Green Bay Packers in 1962 where he sacked Bart Starr 6 times, including one for a safety.

During his stint with the Rams, Brown, along with Deacon Jones, Lamar Lundy, and Merlin Olsen formed the "Fearsome Foursome", the most feared defensive line at the time. He retired after three seasons with the Rams, ending a career in which he was an NFL Pro Bowl player for 6 straight seasons (1962–1967) and a 2-time first-team All-Pro (1962 and 1963). Brown was the first NFL player to have a playing weight over 300 lb but his size and speed made him one of the most dynamic players of the time.

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