Rich Sutter - Playing Career

Playing Career

Rich Sutter was drafted 10th overall by the Pittsburgh Penguins in the 1982 NHL Entry Draft, the same draft that saw his twin brother, Ron, get drafted 4th overall by the Philadelphia Flyers. Ron and Rich both played on the Lethbridge Broncos in the WHL, and together they led that team to the Memorial Cup in 1983. Rich would only play 9 games for the Penguins after Junior, before being traded to Ron's Flyers. Sutter was traded again in 1986 to the Vancouver Canucks. He would play four seasons with the Canucks, before being traded again, this time to the St. Louis Blues. Sutter would play for the Chicago Blackhawks, Tampa Bay Lightning, and Toronto Maple Leafs before retiring in 1995.

Read more about this topic:  Rich Sutter

Other articles related to "playing career, playing, career":

Pat Riley - Biography - Playing Career
... Despite this, overall, his playing career was undistinguished, as he was a perennial bench player ... Riley finished his NBA playing career with a 7.4 points per game scoring average and a field-goal percentage of 41.4% ...
John Gibbons - Playing Career
... of the 1980 amateur draft, Gibbons had a very brief 18-game major league playing career as a catcher with the Mets in 1984 and 1986 ...
Contemporary Folk Music - Major Performers Who Emerged From The 1940s To The Early 1960s
... Singers Almanac members Millard Lampell, Lee Hays, Pete Seeger, and Woody Guthrie began playing together informally in 1940 the Almanac Singers were formed in December 1940 ... around as an itinerant singer during the early 1930s, earning his way by doing odd jobs and playing his banjo and guitar ... In 1930, he had a brief, local radio career on WBOW radio in Terre Haute, Indiana, and in the 1940s he had his own radio show, titled The Wayfaring Stranger, titled after ...

Famous quotes containing the words career and/or playing:

    Each of the professions means a prejudice. The necessity for a career forces every one to take sides. We live in the age of the overworked, and the under-educated; the age in which people are so industrious that they become absolutely stupid.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

    Living toys are something novel,
    But it soon wears off somehow.
    Fetch the shoebox, fetch the shovel
    Mam, we’re playing funerals now.
    Philip Larkin (1922–1986)