Research Institute - Research Institutes in Early Modern Europe

Research Institutes in Early Modern Europe

From the throes of the Scientific Revolution came the 17th century scientific academy. In France Louis XIV founded the Académie Royale des Sciences in 1666 which came after private academic assemblies had been created earlier in the seventeenth century to foster research. In London, the Royal Society was founded.

In the early 18th century Peter the Great established an educational-research institute to be built in his newly created imperial capital, St Petersburg. His plan combined provisions for linguistic, philosophical and scientific instruction with a separate academy in which graduates could pursue further scientific research. It was the first institution of its kind in Europe to conduct scientific research within the structure of a university. The St Petersburg Academy was established by decree on 28 January 1724.

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