Regulation is the promulgation, monitoring and enforcement of rules. Regulation creates, limits, or constrains a right, creates or limits a duty, or allocates a responsibility. Regulation can take many forms: legal restrictions promulgated by a government authority, contractual obligations that bind many parties (for example, "insurance regulations" that arise out of contracts between insurers and their insureds), self-regulation by an industry such as through a trade association, social regulation (e.g. norms), co-regulation, third, party regulation, certification, accreditation or market regulation. In its legal sense regulation can and should be distinguished from primary legislation (by Parliament of elected legislative body) on the one hand and judge-made law on the other.

Regulation mandated by a state attempts to produce outcomes which might not otherwise occur, produce or prevent outcomes in different places to what might otherwise occur, or produce or prevent outcomes in different timescales than would otherwise occur. In this way, regulations can be seen as implementation artifacts of policy statements. Common examples of regulation include controls on market entries, prices, wages, development approvals, pollution effects, employment for certain people in certain industries, standards of production for certain goods, the military forces and services. The economics of imposing or removing regulations relating to markets is analysed in regulatory economics.

Read more about Regulation:  Reasons For Regulation, History, Deregulation, Regulatory Reform and Liberalization

Other articles related to "regulation, regulations":

Regulatory Economics - Regulation As A Process
... therefore have some form of control or regulation to manage these possible conflicts ... This regulation ensures that a safe and appropriate service is delivered, while not discouraging the effective functioning and development of businesses ... the sale and consumption of alcohol and prescription drugs are controlled by regulation in most countries, as are the food business, provision of personal or residential care, public transport, construction, film and ...
Regulation - Deregulation, Regulatory Reform and Liberalization
... Enterprise Institute, the cost to the economy of government regulation in the United States is approximately $1.75 trillion per year, which exceeds all ... simplifying, and making more cost effective regulations ... Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, and the United Kingdom's Better Regulation Commission ...
Interleukin 21
... Cellular component • extracellular space Biological process • positive regulation of natural killer cell cytokine production • immune response • signal transduction ...
Interleukin 29
... interleukin-28 receptor complex Biological process • negative regulation of type 2 immune response • negative regulation of cell proliferation • negative regulation ...
Projectionist - Historical Background - Early Cinema (1895-1915)
... several major fires during the cinema's first decade resulted in the increasing regulation of the film exhibition industry, including the requirement that ... Trade union-based regulation of the profession was also widespread in some jurisdictions, in which the licensing of projectionists was incorporated into collective ... The original reason for this regulation was the necessity for safety precautions for the use of nitrate prints, and hence the requirement that projectionists should be formally ...

Famous quotes containing the word regulation:

    Lots of white people think black people are stupid. They are stupid themselves for thinking so, but regulation will not make them smarter.
    Stephen Carter (b. 1954)

    Nothing changes my twenty-six years in the military. I continue to love it and everything it stands for and everything I was able to accomplish in it. To put up a wall against the military because of one regulation would be doing the same thing that the regulation does in terms of negating people.
    Margarethe Cammermeyer (b. 1942)

    Nothing can be more real, or concern us more, than our own sentiments of pleasure and uneasiness; and if these be favourable to virtue and unfavourable to vice, no more can be requisite to the regulation of our conduct and behavior.
    David Hume (1711–1776)