Reform

Reform means the improvement or amendment of what is wrong, corrupt, unsatisfactory, etc. The use of the word in this way emerges in the late 1700’s and is believed to originate from Christopher Wyvill’s Association movement which identified “Parliamentary Reform” as its primary aim.

Reform is generally distinguished from revolution. The latter means basic or radical change; whereas reform may be no more than fine tuning, or at most redressing serious wrongs without altering the fundamentals of the system. Reform seeks to improve the system as it stands, never to overthrow it wholesale. Radicals on the other hand, seek to improve the system, but try to overthrow whether it be the government or a group of people themselves.

Rotation in office or term limits would, by contrast, be more revolutionary, in altering basic political connections between incumbents and constituents.

Developing countries may carry out a wide range of reforms to improve their living standards, often with support from international financial institutions and aid agencies. This can include reforms to macroeconomic policy, the civil service, and public financial management.

Read more about Reform:  Re-form

Other articles related to "reform":

Elections In The United Kingdom - Current Issues - Electoral Reform
... and some pressure groups such as Charter 88, Unlock Democracy and the Electoral Reform Society ... and 2003 Independent Commissions were formed to look into electoral reform ... The broad-based Make Votes Count Coalition currently brings together those groups advocating reform ...
Unreformed House Of Commons - Movements For Reform
... A reform movement began in the mid-18th century ... Although the Whig party was ambivalent in its attitude to reform, some Whig leaders like Fox and Earl Grey raised the issue many times, but nothing was achieved in the face of Tory resistance ... Between 1815 and 1832 pressure for reform mounted steadily ...
1931 In New Zealand - Incumbents - Government
... with the coalition of the United Party and the Labour Party with the Reform Party in opposition ... The Reform Party, fearing that the Depression would give Labour a substantial boost, reluctantly agreed to form a coalition with United to avert elections ... By forming a coalition, United and Reform were able to blunt Labour's advantage, ending the possibility of the anti-Labour vote being split and the general election in December saw the United/Reform ...
Reform - Re-form
... a mold/mould, or a band that gets back together, the proper term is re-form (with a hyphen), not "reform" ...
Birmingham - History - Regency and Victorian
... prominence in the campaign for political reform in the early nineteenth century, with Thomas Attwood and the Birmingham Political Union bringing the country to the brink of civil war during the Days of May that ... Lord Durham, who drafted the act, wrote that "the country owed Reform to Birmingham, and its salvation from revolution" ... led John Bright to make Birmingham the platform for his successful campaign for the Second Reform Act of 1867, which extended voting rights to the urban working ...

Famous quotes containing the word reform:

    The reform [of the civil service] should be thorough, radical, and complete.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    You have to make more noise than anybody else, you have to make yourself more obtrusive than anybody else, you have to fill all the papers more than anybody else, in fact you have to be there all the time and see that they do not snow you under, if you are really going to get your reform realized.
    Emmeline Pankhurst (1858–1928)

    Short of a wholesale reform of college athletics—a complete breakdown of the whole system that is now focused on money and power—the women’s programs are just as doomed as the men’s are to move further and further away from the academic mission of their colleges.... We have to decide if that’s the kind of success for women’s sports that we want.
    Christine H. B. Grant, U.S. university athletic director. As quoted in the Chronicle of Higher Education, p. A42 (May 12, 1993)