Reading Law - Modern Practice

Modern Practice

A small number of jurisdictions still permit this. In a 2006 NPR article on reading law in Vermont, reporter Nina Keck twice referred to "seven states" that permit the practice, and there are online references saying that Wyoming is one of these. In California, Maine, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington, an applicant who has not attended law school may take the bar exam after reading law under a judge or practicing attorney for an extended period of time. The required time varies. Exact rules vary as well; for example, Virginia doesn't allow the reader to be gainfully employed by the tutoring lawyer, while Washington requires just that. The State of New York requires that applicants who are reading law must have at least one year of law school study and Maine requires applicants to have completed at least two-thirds of a law degree. Such persons are sometimes called country lawyers or county-seat lawyers.

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Orthodox Judaism Outreach - Varieties - Modern Practice
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