Quebec - Demography

Demography

Historical populations
Year Pop. ±%
1851 892,061
1861 1,111,566 +24.6%
1871 1,191,516 +7.2%
1881 1,359,027 +14.1%
1891 1,488,535 +9.5%
1901 1,648,898 +10.8%
1911 2,005,776 +21.6%
1921 2,360,665 +17.7%
1931 2,874,255 +21.8%
1941 3,331,882 +15.9%
1951 4,055,681 +21.7%
1956 4,628,378 +14.1%
1961 5,259,211 +13.6%
1966 5,780,845 +9.9%
1971 6,027,765 +4.3%
1976 6,234,445 +3.4%
1981 6,438,403 +3.3%
1986 6,532,460 +1.5%
1991 6,895,963 +5.6%
1996 7,138,795 +3.5%
2001 7,237,479 +1.4%
2006 7,546,131 +4.3%
2011 7,903,001 +4.7%
Source: Statistics Canada

At 1.74 children per woman, Quebec's 2010 fertility rate is above the Canada-wide rate of 1.59, and has increased for five consecutive years. However, it is still below the replacement fertility rate of 2.1. This contrasts with its fertility rates before 1960, which were among the highest of any industrialized society. Although Quebec is home to only 23.9 percent of the population of Canada, the number of international adoptions in Quebec is the highest of all provinces of Canada. In 2001, 42 percent of international adoptions in Canada were carried out in Quebec. By 2012, the population of Quebec reached 8 million and the population is expected to reach 9.2 million in 2056.

All the tables in the following section have been reduced from their original size, for full tables see main article Demographics of Quebec.

Origins in this table are self-reported and respondents were allowed to give more than one answer.

Ethnic origin (2006)
Ethnic origin Population Percent
Canadian (Canadiens) 4,474,115 60.1%
French 2,151,655 28.9%
Irish 406,085 5.5%
Italian 299,655 4.0%
English 245,155 3.3%
North American Indian 219,815 3.0%
Scottish 202,515 2.7%
Québécois 140,075 1.9%
German 131,795 1.8%

The 2006 census counted a total aboriginal population of 108,425 (1.5 percent) including 65,085 North American Indians (0.9 percent), 27,985 Métis (0.4 percent), and 10,950 Inuit (0.15 percent). It should be noted however, that there is a significant undercount, as many of the biggest Indian bands regularly refuse to participate in Canadian censuses for political reasons regarding the question of aboriginal sovereignty. In particular, the largest Mohawk Iroquois reserves (Kahnawake, Akwesasne and Kanesatake) were not counted.

Nearly 9 percent of the population of Quebec belongs to a visible minority group. This is a lower percentage than that of British Columbia, Ontario, Alberta, and Manitoba but higher than that of the other five provinces. Most visible minorities in Quebec live in or near Montreal.

Visible minorities (2006)
Visible minority Population Percentage
Total visible minority population 654,355 8.8%
Black 188,070 2.5%
Arab 109,020 1.5%
Latin American 89,505 1.2%
Chinese 79,830 1.1%
South Asian 72,845 1.0%
Southeast Asian 50,455 0.7%

Quebec is unique among the provinces in its overwhelmingly Roman Catholic population. This is a legacy of colonial times when only Roman Catholics were permitted to settle in New France. The 2001 census showed the population to be 90.3 percent Christian (in contrast to 77 percent for the whole country) with 83.4 percent Catholic Christian (including 83.2 percent Roman Catholic); 4.7 percent Protestant Christian (including 1.2 percent Anglican, 0.7 percent United Church; and 0.5 percent Baptist); 1.4 percent Orthodox Christian (including 0.7 percent Greek Orthodox); and 0.8 percent other Christian; as well as 1.5 percent Muslim; 1.3 percent Jewish; 0.6 percent Buddhist; 0.3 percent Hindu; and 0.1 percent Sikh. An additional 5.8 percent of the population said they had no religious affiliation (including 5.6 percent who stated that they had no religion at all).

Read more about this topic:  Quebec

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