Pursuit

Pursuit may refer to:

Read more about Pursuit:  Places, Media and The Arts, Games and Sport, Vehicles, See Also

Other articles related to "pursuit":

Trivial Pursuit: America Plays
... Trivial Pursuit America Plays is a syndicated game show loosely based on the board game of the same name ... Trivial Pursuit America Plays replaced Temptation on a majority of stations that carried it, and inherited its predecessor's abysmal ratings ...
Tim Carswell
... medals at the 1998 Commonwealth Games one in the twenty kilometre scratch race and one in the team pursuit alongside fellow riders Brendon Cameron, Greg Henderson and Lee Vertongen ... the team came 8th in the 4000m team pursuit, and in 2000 at Sydney the team came 6th in the 4000m team pursuit ...
Action Of 18 September 1810 - Pursuit
... At 1400, Ceylon spotted Hamelin's ships in pursuit and her crew increased their efforts to escape, mistaking Victor, which carried three masts, for a larger ship and therefore considering themselves ...
Matt Illingworth - Palmarès - Track
1996 3rd World Cup, Germany, Team Pursuit, (with Hayles, Newton Steel) 3rd World Cup, Italy, Team Pursuit, (with Wallace, Newton Steel) 1997 3rd World Cup, Greece, Team Pursuit (with Clay ...
Christian Kux - Palmares
2001 Germany U17 Pursuit Champion 2002 Germany U19 Pursuit Champion , European U19 Team Pursuit Championship 3rd, National U19 Team Pursuit Time Trial ...

Famous quotes containing the word pursuit:

    Such is always the pursuit of knowledge. The celestial fruits, the golden apples of the Hesperides, are ever guarded by a hundred-headed dragon which never sleeps, so that it is an Herculean labor to pluck them.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    It is commonly supposed that the art of pleasing is a wonderful aid in the pursuit of fortune; but the art of being bored is infinitely more successful.
    —Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741–1794)

    Whenever a person strives, by the help of dialectic, to start in pursuit of every reality by a simple process of reason, independent of all sensuous information—never flinching, until by an act of the pure intelligence he has grasped the real nature of good—he arrives at the very end of the intellectual world.
    Plato (c. 427–347 B.C.)