Prisoners and Hats Puzzle

The prisoners and hats puzzle is an induction puzzle (a kind of logic puzzle) that involves reasoning about the actions of other people, drawing in aspects of Game theory sometimes called the hierarchy of beliefs. There are many variations, but the central theme remains the same. Not to be confused with the similar Hat Puzzle.

Read more about Prisoners And Hats Puzzle:  The Puzzle, The Solution

Other articles related to "prisoners and hats puzzle, prisoners, prisoner, hat":

Prisoners And Hats Puzzle - Variants - Countably Infinite Hat Problem With Hearing - Countably Infinite-Hat With Hearing Solution
... It turns out that, if one allows the prisoners to hear the colors called out by the other prisoners, it is possible to guarantee the life of every prisoner except the first, who dies with a 50% probability ... everyone after him can determine exactly what his own hat color is ... strings the first person saw, and thus he can determine his own hat color ...

Famous quotes containing the words puzzle, prisoners and/or hats:

    Scholars and artists thrown together are often annoyed at the puzzle of where they differ. Both work from knowledge; but I suspect they differ most importantly in the way their knowledge is come by. Scholars get theirs with conscientious thoroughness along projected lines of logic; poets theirs cavalierly and as it happens in and out of books. They stick to nothing deliberately, but let what will stick to them like burrs where they walk in the fields.
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    We are all conceived in close prison; in our mothers’ wombs, we are close prisoners all; when we are born, we are born but to the liberty of the house; prisoners still, though within larger walls; and then all our life is but a going out to the place of execution, to death.
    John Donne (c. 1572–1631)

    There is the rich quarter, with its houses of pink and white, and
    its crumbling, leafy terraces.
    There is the poorer quarter, its homes a deep blue.
    There is the market, where men are selling hats and swatting flies
    John Ashbery (b. 1927)