Prince Gong

Some articles on prince, prince gong, princes:

Empress Dowager Cixi - Regency Over The Guangxu Emperor - New Challenges
... disagreement between the two Dowagers, Zaitian, the first-born of the Prince Chun Yixuan and Cixi's sister, then aged four, was to become the new Emperor ... power structure was now tipped completely in Cixi's favor, and Prince Gong's position was considerably weakened ... The once fierce and determined Prince Gong, frustrated by Cixi's iron grip on power, did little to question Cixi on state affairs, and supported ...
Empress Dowager Cixi - Xinyou Coup: Ousting Sushun
... Among them was Prince Gong, who had great ambitions and was at that time excluded from the power circle, and the Prince Chun, the sixth and seventh sons ... While she aligned herself with these Princes, a memorial came from Shandong asking for Cixi to "listen to politics behind the curtains", i.e ... The same petition also asked Prince Gong to enter the political arena as a principal "aide to the Emperor." When the Emperor's funeral procession left for Beijing ...
Prince Gong Mansion - History
... The Prince Gong Mansion was constructed in 1777 during the Qing Dynasty for Heshen, a prominent court official in the reign of the Qianlong Emperor ... The mansion was given to Prince Qing (庆郡王), the 17th and youngest son of the Qianlong Emperor ... assigned it to his brother Yixin, Prince Gong ...
Prince Gong (Qing Dynasty)
... I Hin 11 January 1833 - 29 May 1898), better known as Prince Gong (or Prince Kung in Wades-Giles) or formally Prince Gong of the First Rank (恭親王), was a prince and statesman of the Qing Dynasty ... Commonly referred to as the "Sixth Prince" (六王爺) in his time, Yixin was nicknamed "Devil Number Six" (鬼子六) by conservatives in the Qing imperial court ...

Famous quotes containing the word prince:

    A prince must be prudent enough to know how to escape the bad reputation of those vices that would lose the state for him, and must protect himself from those that will not lose it for him, if this is possible; but if he cannot, he need not concern himself unduly if he ignores these less serious vices.
    Niccolò Machiavelli (1469–1527)