Press

Press may refer to:

Read more about Press:  Media, Machines, Other Uses

Other articles related to "press":

Jean-Fran├žois Lyotard - Selected Publications
... Albany State University of New York Press, 1991 ... Minneapolis University of Minnesota Press, 2011 ... Bloomington Indiana University Press, 1993 ...
J. L. Mackie - Publications
... and Paradox (1973), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824402-9 ... Cement of the Universe A Study of Causation (1974), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824642-0 ... Problems from Locke (1976), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824555-6 ...
Freedom - Arts and Entertainment - Press
... Freedom (newspaper), British anarchist newspaper Freedom Press, British anarchist publishing house ...
J. L. Austin - Sources
... Oxford The Clarendon Press, 1973 ... New York Oxford University Press, 1990 ... Austin.New York Humanities Press, 1969 ...
John Fell (bishop) - Career - Oxford University Press
... In the theatre was placed the Oxford University Press, the establishment of which had been a favourite project of Laud and now engaged a large share of Fell's energy and attention, and which as curator he ... to imagine how assiduous and drudging he is about his press." He sent for type and printers from Holland, declaring that "the foundation of all success must be laid in doing things ...

Famous quotes containing the word press:

    The press and politicians. A delicate relationship. Too close, and danger ensues. Too far apart and democracy itself cannot function without the essential exchange of information. Creative leaks, a discreet lunch, interchange in the Lobby, the art of the unattributable telephone call, late at night.
    Howard Brenton (b. 1942)

    What chiefly distinguishes the daily press of the United States from the press of all other countries is not its lack of truthfulness or even its lack of dignity and honor, for these deficiencies are common to the newspapers everywhere, but its incurable fear of ideas, its constant effort to evade the discussion of fundamentals by translating all issues into a few elemental fears, its incessant reduction of all reflection to mere emotion. It is, in the true sense, never well-informed.
    —H.L. (Henry Lewis)

    Whenever [Leonard Bernstein] entered or exited a country he would fill in on his passport form not composer or conductor, but musician. Of course people in the press spent a lot of Lenny’s life telling him what he should have done; he should have been a concert pianist, he should have composed more.... And people wouldn’t let him live his own life. But he created his own career, in his own image.
    John Mauceri (b. 1945)