Press

Press may refer to:

Read more about Press:  Media, Machines, Other Uses

Other articles related to "press":

J. L. Austin - Sources
... Oxford The Clarendon Press, 1973 ... New York Oxford University Press, 1990 ... Austin.New York Humanities Press, 1969 ...
Jean-Fran├žois Lyotard - Selected Publications
... Albany State University of New York Press, 1991 ... Minneapolis University of Minnesota Press, 2011 ... Bloomington Indiana University Press, 1993 ...
Freedom - Arts and Entertainment - Press
... Magazine, Scientology publication Freedom (newspaper), British anarchist newspaper Freedom Press, British anarchist publishing house ...
J. L. Mackie - Publications
... Books Truth, Probability, and Paradox (1973), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824402-9 ... of Causation (1974), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824642-0 ... from Locke (1976), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824555-6 ...
John Fell (bishop) - Career - Oxford University Press
... In the theatre was placed the Oxford University Press, the establishment of which had been a favourite project of Laud and now engaged a large share of Fell's energy and attention, and which as curator he ... to imagine how assiduous and drudging he is about his press." He sent for type and printers from Holland, declaring that "the foundation of all success must be laid in doing ...

Famous quotes containing the word press:

    Character wants room; must not be crowded on by persons, nor be judged from glimpses got in the press of affairs, or on few occasions. It needs perspective, as a great building.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    If thou be invited of a mighty man, withdraw thyself, and so much the more will he invite thee. Press thou not upon him, lest thou be put back; stand not far off, lest thou be forgotten.
    Apocrypha. Ecclesiasticus 13:9-10.

    Both gossip and joking are intrinsically valuable activities. Both are essentially social activities that strengthen interpersonal bonds—we do not tell jokes and gossip to ourselves. As popular activities that evade social restrictions, they often refer to topics that are inaccessible to serious public discussion. Gossip and joking often appear together: when we gossip we usually tell jokes and when we are joking we often gossip as well.
    Aaron Ben-Ze’Ev, Israeli philosopher. “The Vindication of Gossip,” Good Gossip, University Press of Kansas (1994)