Press

Press may refer to:

Read more about Press:  Media, Machines, Other Uses

Other articles related to "press":

Freedom - Arts and Entertainment - Press
... Freedom Communications, privately held national media company headquartered in Irvine, California Freedom Magazine, Scientology publication Freedom (newspaper), British anarchist newspaper Freedom Press, British anarchist publishing house. ...
J. L. Mackie - Publications
... Books Truth, Probability, and Paradox (1973), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824402-9 ... Universe A Study of Causation (1974), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824642-0 ... Problems from Locke (1976), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824555-6 ...
Jean-Fran├žois Lyotard - Selected Publications
... Albany State University of New York Press, 1991 ... Minneapolis University of Minnesota Press, 2011 ... Bloomington Indiana University Press, 1993 ...
J. L. Austin - Sources
... Oxford The Clarendon Press, 1973 ... New York Oxford University Press, 1990 ... Austin.New York Humanities Press, 1969 ...
John Fell (bishop) - Career - Oxford University Press
... In the theatre was placed the Oxford University Press, the establishment of which had been a favourite project of Laud and now engaged a large share of Fell's energy and attention, and which as curator he ... Williamson in 1672, "it were impossible to imagine how assiduous and drudging he is about his press." He sent for type and printers from Holland ...

Famous quotes containing the word press:

    Character wants room; must not be crowded on by persons, nor be judged from glimpses got in the press of affairs, or on few occasions. It needs perspective, as a great building.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Christianity as an organized religion has not always had a harmonious relationship with the family. Unlike Judaism, it kept almost no rituals that took place in private homes. The esteem that monasticism and priestly celibacy enjoyed implied a denigration of marriage and parenthood.
    Beatrice Gottlieb, U.S. historian. The Family in the Western World from the Black Death to the Industrial Age, ch. 12, Oxford University Press (1993)

    The Dada object reflected an ironic posture before the consecrated forms of art. The surrealist object differs significantly in this respect. It stands for a mysterious relationship with the outer world established by man’s sensibility in a way that involves concrete forms in projecting the artist’s inner model.
    —J.H. Matthews. “Object Lessons,” The Imagery of Surrealism, Syracuse University Press (1977)