Press

Press may refer to:

Read more about Press:  Media, Machines, Other Uses

Other articles related to "press":

Jean-Fran├žois Lyotard - Selected Publications
... Albany State University of New York Press, 1991 ... Minneapolis University of Minnesota Press, 2011 ... Bloomington Indiana University Press, 1993 ...
Freedom - Arts and Entertainment - Press
... Freedom Communications, privately held national media company headquartered in Irvine, California Freedom Magazine, Scientology publication Freedom (newspaper), British anarchist newspaper Freedom Press, British anarchist publishing house. ...
John Fell (bishop) - Career - Oxford University Press
... was placed the Oxford University Press, the establishment of which had been a favourite project of Laud and now engaged a large share of Fell's energy and attention, and which as curator he ... to imagine how assiduous and drudging he is about his press." He sent for type and printers from Holland, declaring that "the foundation of all success must be laid in doing things well, which l ...
J. L. Austin - Sources
... Oxford The Clarendon Press, 1973 ... New York Oxford University Press, 1990 ... Austin.New York Humanities Press, 1969 ...
J. L. Mackie - Publications
... Truth, Probability, and Paradox (1973), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824402-9 ... of the Universe A Study of Causation (1974), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824642-0 ... Problems from Locke (1976), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824555-6 ...

Famous quotes containing the word press:

    It is in the nature of allegory, as opposed to symbolism, to beg the question of absolute reality. The allegorist avails himself of a formal correspondence between “ideas” and “things,” both of which he assumes as given; he need not inquire whether either sphere is “real” or whether, in the final analysis, reality consists in their interaction.
    Charles, Jr. Feidelson, U.S. educator, critic. Symbolism and American Literature, ch. 1, University of Chicago Press (1953)

    Our presidents have been getting to be synthetic monsters, the work of a hundred ghost- writers and press agents so that it is getting harder and harder to discover the line between the man and the institution.
    John Dos Passos (1896–1970)

    An art whose limits depend on a moving image, mass audience, and industrial production is bound to differ from an art whose limits depend on language, a limited audience, and individual creation. In short, the filmed novel, in spite of certain resemblances, will inevitably become a different artistic entity from the novel on which it is based.
    George Bluestone, U.S. educator, critic. “The Limits of the Novel and the Limits of the Film,” Novels Into Film, Johns Hopkins Press (1957)