Press

Press may refer to:

Read more about Press:  Media, Machines, Other Uses

Other articles related to "press":

Freedom - Arts and Entertainment - Press
... publication Freedom (newspaper), British anarchist newspaper Freedom Press, British anarchist publishing house ...
Jean-Fran├žois Lyotard - Selected Publications
... Albany State University of New York Press, 1991 ... Minneapolis University of Minnesota Press, 2011 ... Bloomington Indiana University Press, 1993 ...
J. L. Austin - Sources
... Oxford The Clarendon Press, 1973 ... New York Oxford University Press, 1990 ... Austin.New York Humanities Press, 1969 ...
J. L. Mackie - Publications
... Books Truth, Probability, and Paradox (1973), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824402-9 ... The Cement of the Universe A Study of Causation (1974), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824642-0 ... Problems from Locke (1976), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824555-6 ...
John Fell (bishop) - Career - Oxford University Press
... In the theatre was placed the Oxford University Press, the establishment of which had been a favourite project of Laud and now engaged a large share ... how assiduous and drudging he is about his press." He sent for type and printers from Holland, declaring that "the foundation of all success must be laid in doing things well, which l ...

Famous quotes containing the word press:

    Television ... helps blur the distinction between framed and unframed reality. Whereas going to the movies necessarily entails leaving one’s ordinary surroundings, soap operas are in fact spatially inseparable from the rest of one’s life. In homes where television is on most of the time, they are also temporally integrated into one’s “real” life and, unlike the experience of going out in the evening to see a show, may not even interrupt its regular flow.
    Eviatar Zerubavel, U.S. sociologist, educator. The Fine Line: Making Distinctions in Everyday Life, ch. 5, University of Chicago Press (1991)

    If you press me to tell why I loved [my friend], I feel that this cannot be expressed, except by answering: Because it was he, because it was I.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)

    We have our difficulties, true; but we are a wiser and a tougher nation than we were in 1932. Never have there been six years of such far flung internal preparedness in all of history. And this has been done without any dictator’s power to command, without conscription of labor or confiscation of capital, without concentration camps and without a scratch on freedom of speech, freedom of the press or the rest of the Bill of Rights.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)