Pragmatic Theory of Truth

Pragmatic theory of truth refers to those accounts, definitions, and theories of the concept truth that distinguish the philosophies of pragmatism and pragmaticism. The conception of truth in question varies along lines that reflect the influence of several thinkers, initially and notably, Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, and John Dewey, but a number of common features can be identified. The most characteristic features are (1) a reliance on the pragmatic maxim as a means of clarifying the meanings of difficult concepts, truth in particular, and (2) an emphasis on the fact that the product variously branded as belief, certainty, knowledge, or truth is the result of a process, namely, inquiry.

Read more about Pragmatic Theory Of Truth:  Background, Peirce, James, Dewey, Criticism

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Pragmatic Theory Of Truth - Criticism
... Several objections are commonly made to pragmatist account of truth, of either sort ... First, due originally to Bertrand Russell (1907) in a discussion of James's theory, is that pragmatism mixes up the notion of truth with epistemology ... Pragmatism describes an indicator or a sign of truth ...

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