Pottery of Ancient Greece

Pottery Of Ancient Greece

Because of its relative durability, pottery comprises a large part of the archaeological record of Ancient Greece, and since there is so much of it (some 100,000 vases are recorded in the Corpus vasorum antiquorum), it has exerted a disproportionately large influence on our understanding of Greek society. Little survives, for example, of ancient Greek painting except for what is found on the earthenware in everyday use, so we must trace the development of Greek art through its vestiges on a derivative art form. Nevertheless the shards of pots discarded or buried in the first millennium BC are still the best guide we have to the customary life and mind of the ancient Greeks.

Read more about Pottery Of Ancient Greece:  Inscriptions, Rediscovery and Scholarship, Uses and Types of Ancient Greek Pottery

Other articles related to "pottery of ancient greece, ancient, pottery":

Pottery Of Ancient Greece - Uses and Types of Ancient Greek Pottery
... See also Typology of Greek vase shapes Not all ancient Greek vases were purely utilitarian large Geometric amphorae were used as grave markers, kraters in Apulia ... Most other surviving pottery, however, had a practical purpose which determined its shape ... To understand the relationship between form and function Greek pottery may be divided in four broad categories storage and transport vessels, mixing vessels, jugs and cups vases for oils ...

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