Postage Stamps and Postal History of The Confederate States

Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Confederate States

The postage stamps and postal system of the Confederate States of America carried the mail of the Confederacy for a brief period in American history. Early in 1861 when South Carolina no longer considered itself part of the Union and demanded that the U.S. Army abandon Fort Sumter, plans for a Confederate postal system were already underway. Indeed, the Confederate Post office was established on February 21, 1861; and it was not until April 12 that the American Civil War officially began, when the Confederate Army fired upon US soldiers who had refused to abandon the fort. However, the United States Post Office Department continued to handle the mail of the seceded states as usual during the first weeks of the war. It was not until June 1 that the Confederate Post office took over collection and delivery, now faced with the task of providing postage stamps and mail services for its citizens.

The CSA Constitution had provided for a national postal service to be established, then required it to be self-financing beginning March 1, 1863 (Section 8. Powers of Congress, Item 7). President Jefferson Davis had appointed John Henninger Reagan on March 6, 1861, to head the new Confederate States of America Post-office Department. The Confederate Post Office proved to be very efficient and remained in operation for the entire duration of the Civil War.

Read more about Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Confederate StatesBeginnings, Confederate Post Office, Confederate Postage, Covers

Famous quotes containing the words postage stamps and, postage stamps, confederate states, confederate, history, states, stamps, postage and/or postal:

    Designs in connection with postage stamps and coinage may be described, I think, as the silent ambassadors on national taste.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    Designs in connection with postage stamps and coinage may be described, I think, as the silent ambassadors on national taste.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    Figure a man’s only good for one oath at a time. I took mine to the Confederate States of America.
    Frank S. Nugent (1908–1965)

    Well, you Yankees and your holy principle about savin’ the Union. You’re plunderin’ pirates that’s what. Well, you think there’s no Confederate army where you’re goin’. You think our boys are asleep down here. Well, they’ll catch up to you and they’ll cut you to pieces you, you nameless, fatherless scum. I wish I could be there to see it.
    John Lee Mahin (1902–1984)

    In history the great moment is, when the savage is just ceasing to be a savage, with all his hairy Pelasgic strength directed on his opening sense of beauty;—and you have Pericles and Phidias,—and not yet passed over into the Corinthian civility. Everything good in nature and in the world is in that moment of transition, when the swarthy juices still flow plentifully from nature, but their astrigency or acridity is got out by ethics and humanity.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    In the case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of ... powers not granted by the compact, the States ... are in duty bound to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits the authorities, rights, and liberties appertaining to them.
    James Madison (1751–1836)

    What is the worst of woes that wait on age?
    What stamps the wrinkle deeper on the brow?
    To view each loved one blotted from life’s page,
    And be alone on earth, as I am now.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)

    Designs in connection with postage stamps and coinage may be described, I think, as the silent ambassadors on national taste.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    This is the Night Mail crossing the Border,
    Bringing the cheque and the postal order,
    Letters for the rich, letters for the poor,
    The shop at the corner, the girl next door.
    —W.H. (Wystan Hugh)