Postage Stamps

Some articles on postage stamps, stamp, stamps, postage:

Postage Stamps And Postal History Of India
... This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of India ... the Indian Post Office was established in 1837, Asia's first adhesive stamp, the Scinde Dawk, was introduced in 1852 by Sir Bartle Frere, the British East India Company's administrator of the province ... postal systems maintained by various Indian states, some of which produced stamps for use within their respective dominions, while British Indian postage stamps were required ...
Steamboats Of The Upper Columbia And Kootenay Rivers - Upper Columbia Company "postage Stamps"
... Parson, had the company print up its own postage stamps ... One thousand "stamps" with the initials "U.C." (for Upper Columbia Company) and the denomination of 5 cents were printed ... days cost 3 cents to send, so the Upper Columbia Company's "stamps" were considerably more than regular postage ...
Shanghai International Settlement - Postal Services in The International Settlement
... stamps were overprinted for use in Shanghai with the city's name, "China", and amounts double their printed face values ... The British originally used British postage stamps overprinted with the local currency amount, but from 1868, the British changed to Hong Kong postage stamps already ... year 1865 the International settlement began to issue its own postage stamps, denominated in the local Shanghai tael unit ...
Sri Lanka Post - History - Postage Stamps
... The first adhesive stamps (the six-pence purple-brown stamps on blued paper) were issued on 1 April 1857, seventeen years after Britain had introduced the adhesive postage ... The first stamps in local denominations of rupees and cents were issued on 1 February 1892 ...
Lancashire Witch - Postage Stamps
... Lancashire Witch appeared on two postage stamps issued by Funafuti-Tuvalu on 24 December 1984 ...

Famous quotes related to postage stamps:

    Designs in connection with postage stamps and coinage may be described, I think, as the silent ambassadors on national taste.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)