Popular Culture Studies

Popular culture studies is the academic discipline studying popular culture from a critical theory perspective. It is generally considered as a combination of communication studies and cultural studies.

Following the work of the Frankfurt School, popular culture has come to be taken more seriously as a terrain of academic inquiry and has also helped to change the outlooks of more established disciplines. Conceptual barriers between so-called high and low culture have broken down, accompanying an explosion in scholarly interest in popular culture, which encompasses such diverse media as comic books, television, and the Internet. Reevaluation of mass culture in the 1970s and 1980s has revealed significant problems with the traditional view of mass culture as degraded and elite culture as uplifting. Divisions between high and low culture have been increasingly seen as political distinctions rather than defensible aesthetic or intellectual ones.

Read more about Popular Culture Studies:  Contemporary Popular Culture Studies, Neuroscience

Other articles related to "popular culture studies, popular culture, popular":

Popular Culture Studies - Neuroscience
... A new area in research into popular culture is neuroimaging which identifies the brain areas whereby social information about popularity of an idea or consumer ... cingulate as key areas in whether people change in regard to something due to its being popular with their peer group ...

Famous quotes containing the words studies, popular and/or culture:

    Even if one studies to an old age, one will never finish learning.
    Chinese proverb.

    The best of us would rather be popular than right.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    Our culture still holds mothers almost exclusively responsible when things go wrong with the kids. Sensing this ultimate accountability, women are understandably reluctant to give up control or veto power. If the finger of blame was eventually going to point in your direction, wouldn’t you be?
    Ron Taffel (20th century)