Popular Culture Studies

Popular culture studies is the academic discipline studying popular culture from a critical theory perspective. It is generally considered as a combination of communication studies and cultural studies.

Following the work of the Frankfurt School, popular culture has come to be taken more seriously as a terrain of academic inquiry and has also helped to change the outlooks of more established disciplines. Conceptual barriers between so-called high and low culture have broken down, accompanying an explosion in scholarly interest in popular culture, which encompasses such diverse media as comic books, television, and the Internet. Reevaluation of mass culture in the 1970s and 1980s has revealed significant problems with the traditional view of mass culture as degraded and elite culture as uplifting. Divisions between high and low culture have been increasingly seen as political distinctions rather than defensible aesthetic or intellectual ones.

Read more about Popular Culture Studies:  Contemporary Popular Culture Studies, Neuroscience

Other articles related to "popular culture studies, popular culture, popular":

Popular Culture Studies - Neuroscience
... A new area in research into popular culture is neuroimaging which identifies the brain areas whereby social information about popularity of an idea or consumer ... change in regard to something due to its being popular with their peer group ...

Famous quotes containing the words popular culture, studies, popular and/or culture:

    Popular culture is seductive; high culture is imperious.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)

    ...Women’s Studies can amount simply to compensatory history; too often they fail to challenge the intellectual and political structures that must be challenged if women as a group are ever to come into collective, nonexclusionary freedom.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    The poet will prevail to be popular in spite of his faults, and in spite of his beauties too. He will hit the nail on the head, and we shall not know the shape of his hammer. He makes us free of his hearth and heart, which is greater than to offer one the freedom of a city.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    It is of the essence of imaginative culture that it transcends the limits both of the naturally possible and of the morally acceptable.
    Northrop Frye (b. 1912)