Polyphony

In music, polyphony is a texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony).

Within the context of the Western musical tradition, the term is usually used to refer to music of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Baroque forms such as the fugue, which might be called polyphonic, are usually described instead as contrapuntal. Also, as opposed to the species terminology of counterpoint, polyphony was generally either "pitch-against-pitch" / "point-against-point" or "sustained-pitch" in one part with melismas of varying lengths in another (van der Werf, 1997). In all cases the conception was likely what Margaret Bent (1999) calls "dyadic counterpoint", with each part being written generally against one other part, with all parts modified if needed in the end. This point-against-point conception is opposed to "successive composition", where voices were written in an order with each new voice fitting into the whole so far constructed, which was previously assumed.

Read more about PolyphonyOrigins, Historical Context, Catholic Church, Notable Works and Artists, Balkan Region, Caucasus Region

Other articles related to "polyphony":

Alesis Quadrasynth - Function
... However, polyphony decreases as more tones are used ... For example, a 1-tone patch would have 64-note polyphony, a 2-tone patch would have 32-note polyphony, and a 4-tone patch would only have 16-note polyphony ...
Polyphony (instrument) - Synthesizer - Number of Voices
5, which was released in 1978 and had five-voice polyphony ... Six-voice polyphony was standard by the middle 1980s ... With the advent of digital synthesizers, 16-voice polyphony became standard by the late 1980s ...
Missa Papae Marcelli - History
... Some debate occurred over whether polyphony should be banned outright in worship, and some of the auxiliary publications by attendants of the Council caution against both of these problems ... in the late 16th century, a legend began that the second of these points, the threat that polyphony might have been banned by the Council because of the ... Marcelli convinced Cardinal Carlo Borromeo, on hearing, that polyphony could be intelligible, and that music such as Palestrina's was all too beautiful to ban from the Church ...
Polyphony - Caucasus Region
... Polyphony in the Republic of Georgia is arguably the oldest polyphony in the Christian world ... Georgian polyphony is traditionally sung in three parts with strong disonnances, parallel fifths, and a unique tuning system based on perfect fifths ... of Georgia (country)#Traditional vocal polyphony ...
Polyphony (literature)
... In literature, polyphony (Russian полифония) is a feature of narrative, which includes a diversity of points of view and voices ... The concept was introduced by Mikhail Bakhtin, based on the musical concept polyphony ... One of the most known examples of polyphony is Dostoevsky's prose ...