Political Abuse of Psychiatry in The Soviet Union

Political Abuse Of Psychiatry In The Soviet Union

Psychiatry in Russia and the USSR

Political abuse (Russia)
Political abuse (USSR)
Independent Psychiatric Association of Russia
Russian Society of Psychiatrists
Russian Mental Health Law
Sluggishly progressing schizophrenia

In the Soviet Union, systematic political abuse of psychiatry took place. Soviet psychiatric hospitals known as "psikhushkas" were used by the authorities as prisons in order to isolate hundreds or thousands of political prisoners from the rest of society, discredit their ideas, and break them physically and mentally. This method was also employed against religious prisoners and most especially against well-educated former atheists who adopted a religion. In such cases their religious faith was determined to be a form of mental illness that needed to be cured. Formerly highly classified extant documents from "Special file" of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union published after the dissolution of the Soviet Union demonstrate that the authorities of the country quite consciously used psychiatry as a tool to suppress dissent.

Following the fall of the Soviet Union, it was often reported that some opposition activists and journalists were detained in Russian psychiatric institutions in order to intimidate and isolate them from society. In modern Russia, human rights activists also face the threat of psychiatric diagnosis as a means of political repression.

The allegations about punitive psychiatry taking place in Russia were rejected by Russian scientists. According to Professor R.A. Nadzharov, Doctor of Medical Sciences and Deputy Director of the USSR Academy of Medical Sciences' Psychiatric Institute,

There can be no doubt that talk in the West of 'the forced commitment to psychiatric hospitals' of certain 'dissident' representatives of the intelligentsia is nothing other than a component part of the anti-Soviet propaganda campaign that certain circles are trying to stir up in pursuit of highly improper political aims."

Read more about Political Abuse Of Psychiatry In The Soviet Union:  Background, Joint Session, Sluggish Schizophrenia, Mass Abuse Onset, Figures, Analysis, Residual Problems, Memoirs, Documents

Other articles related to "political abuse of psychiatry in the soviet union, political, psychiatry, political abuse of psychiatry in the":

Political Abuse Of Psychiatry In The Soviet Union - Documents
... From 1987 to 1991, the International Association on the Political Use of Psychiatry published forty-two numbers of Documents on the Political Abuse of Psychiatry in the ... by the Working Commission to Investigate the Use of Psychiatry For Political Purposes, Chronicle of Current Events by the Moscow Helsinki Group and in the books Punitive Medicine by Alexandr Podrabinek, Bezumnaya ... payment thereby the Russian Federation acknowledged the facts of the use of psychiatry for political purposes and the responsibility of the state to the victims of "political psychiatry." ...

Famous quotes containing the words soviet union, union, soviet, political and/or abuse:

    If the Soviet Union can give up the Brezhnev Doctrine for the Sinatra Doctrine, the United States can give up the James Monroe Doctrine for the Marilyn Monroe Doctrine: Let’s all go to bed wearing the perfume we like best.
    Carlos Fuentes (b. 1928)

    I would save the Union. I would save it the shortest way under the Constitution. The sooner the national authority can be restored; the nearer the Union will be “the Union as it was.”
    Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)

    They were right. The Soviet régime is not the embodiment of evil as you think in the West. They have laws and I broke them. I hate tea and they love tea. Who is wrong?
    Alexander Zinoviev (b. 1922)

    The emotional security and political stability in this country entitle us to be a nuclear power.
    Ronald, Sir Mason (b. 1930)

    Playing games with agreed upon rules helps children learn to live by rules, establish the delicate balance between competition and cooperation, between fair play and justice and exploitation and abuse of these for personal gain. It helps them learn to manage the warmth of winning and the hurt of losing; it helps them to believe that there will be another chance to win the next time.
    James P. Comer (20th century)