Pocahontas Middle School - Notable Persons and Accomplishments - Virginia Randolph

Virginia Randolph

Two local educators associated with Henrico County Public School became notable for contributions to the development of educational programs for African-American students in the late 19th and early to mid-20th century.

Virginia Randolph (1874–1958) became notable for her many years and contributions to the development of educational programs for African-American students during the days of segregated schools in Virginia. Educated at Richmond's Armstrong High School, in 1892, Ms. Randolph opened the Mountain Road School in the north central part of the county. As a teacher there, Randolph taught her students woodworking, sewing, cooking, and gardening, as well as academics. In 1908, Henrico County Superintendent of Schools Jackson T. Davis named her to become the United States' first "Jeanes Supervising Industrial Teacher".

As the overseer of twenty three elementary schools in Henrico County, Virginia Randolph developed the first in-service training program for African American teachers and worked on improving the curriculum of the schools. With the freedom to design her own agenda, she shaped industrial work and community self-help programs to meet specific needs of schools. During her 57-year career, although she remained at work in Henrico County, she became recognized worldwide as a pioneering educator, humanitarian and leader, especially in the field of vocational education. She retired in 1949.

In Glen Allen, the Virginia Randolph Home Economics Cottage was made into a museum in memory of Randolph in 1970. The Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission designated the museum a State Historic Landmark. In 1976 the museum was named a National Historic Landmark by the United States Department of Interior, National Park Service. Randolph reportedly had an office in the building. Her grave site is on the grounds. Randolph is interred on the museum grounds. In modern times, Virginia Randolph Community High School in Glen Allen, Virginia and a special education center are each named in her honor. The Virginia Randolph Foundation, formed in 1954, annually awards scholarships to Henrico County high school students who will be attending a 4 year college or university.

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Other articles related to "virginia, randolph, virginia randolph":

Jackson T. Davis - Career - Virginia Public Schools
... professionally involved with another Virginian, Virginia Estelle Randolph, who was also to become well known in African-American education as they led Henrico County's role in beginning the ... Virginia Estelle Randolph was the third child of former slaves Sarah Elizabeth Carter Randolph and Edward Nelson Randolph ... the age of 16, she graduated from Richmond Normal School (now Armstrong High School) in Richmond, Virginia ...
Virginia Randolph - Legacy
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National Register Of Historic Places Listings In Henrico County, Virginia
... Register of Historic Places in Henrico County, Virginia ... and south of, but does not include, the legally independent city of Richmond, Virginia. 13, 1974 Mountain and Courtney Rds Glen Allen Virginia Randolph Cottage 01974-12-02December 2, 2200 ... Mountain Rd Glen Allen Home economics building of the Virginia ...
Virginia Randolph Cottage
... Virginia Randolph Cottage, also known as Virginia E ... Randolph Museum, Virginia Cardwell Cottage, or Home Economics Cottage, is a building that was built in 1937 in Glen Allen, Virginia, United States ... It was the home economics building of the Virginia Randolph Training School, a vocational school ...

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    —Archie Randolph Ammons (b. 1926)