Pleading in English Act 1362

The Pleading in English Act 1362 (36 Edw. III c. 15), often rendered Statute of Pleading, was an Act of the Parliament of England. The Act complained that because the French language was much unknown in England, the people therefore had no knowledge of what is being said for them or against them in the courts, which used Law French. The Act therefore stipulated that "all Pleas which shall be pleaded in Courts whatsoever, before any of his Justices whatsoever, or in his other Places, or before any of His other Ministers whatsoever, or in the Courts and Places of any other Lords whatsoever within the Realm, shall be pleaded, shewed, defended, answered, debated, and judged in the English Tongue, and that they be entered and inrolled in Latin".

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Pleading In English Act 1362 - Historical Context
... For more details on this topic, see Legal English#Historical development ... see Celtic law), and written in the Germanic vernacular (Old English) since circa 600 (following the Anglo-Saxon invasion of Britain), beginning with the law code of Æthelberht ... the latest conquerors was used – Anglo-Norman (which developed into Law French) was used for pleadings, and Latin was used in writing ...

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