People's Republic of China At The FIFA World Cup

This article is People's Republic of China at the FIFA World Cup is on the record of China PR's results at the FIFA World Cup. The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the men's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the first tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946, due to World War II.

Read more about People's Republic Of China At The FIFA World CupHistory, Records, China At Japan/South Korea 2002

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