Partial Thromboplastin Time

The partial thromboplastin time (PTT) or activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT or APTT) is a performance indicator measuring the efficacy of both the "intrinsic" (now referred to as the contact activation pathway) and the common coagulation pathways. Apart from detecting abnormalities in blood clotting, it is also used to monitor the treatment effects with heparin, a major anticoagulant. It is used in conjunction with the prothrombin time (PT) which measures the extrinsic pathway. Kaolin cephalin clotting time (KccT) is a historic name for the activated partial thromboplastin time.

Read more about Partial Thromboplastin Time:  Method, Interpretation, History

Other articles related to "partial thromboplastin time, time":

Heparin - Medical Use - Mechanism of Action
... Monitoring of the activated partial thromboplastin time is also not required and does not reflect the anticoagulant effect, as APTT is insensitive to ... of heparin are measured in the lab by the partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), one of the measures of the time it takes the blood plasma to clot ... Partial thromboplastin time should not be confused with Prothrombin time, or PT, which measures blood clotting time through a different pathway of the ...
Von Willebrand Disease - Diagnosis
... A platelet function assay (PFA) will give an abnormal collagen/adrenaline closure time and in most cases (but not all) a normal collagen/ADP time ... problems are a complete blood count (especially platelet counts), APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time), prothrombin time, thrombin time and fibrinogen level ... Patients with von Willebrand disease will typically display a normal prothrombin time and a variable prolongation of partial thromboplastin time ...

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