Parker

Parker may refer to people with first name Parker or the surname Parker.

Read more about Parker:  Persons, Fictional Characters, Companies, Schools, Other Uses

Other articles related to "parker":

Foxhall A. Parker, Sr. - Biography
... Born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, Parker joined the Navy as a midshipman on January 1, 1808 ... Parker, Jr ... (1821-1879) and William Harwar Parker (1826-1896), who were also prominent naval officers ...
Edie Parker
... Edie Kerouac-Parker (1922–1993) was the author of her memoir, "You'll Be Okay" from the Beat Generation, and the first wife of Jack Kerouac ... Parker was a native of Grosse Pointe, Michigan ...
Parker Stevenson
... Parker Stevenson (born Richard Stevenson Parker, Jr on June 4, 1952) is an American television and film actor ...
Oakland Athletics All-time Roster - P
... Craig Paquette, IF, 1993-1995 Tony Parisse, C, 1943-1944 Ace Parker, IF, 1937-1938 Dave Parker, OF, 1988-1989 Jarrod Parker, P, 2012 Roy Parmelee, P, 1939 Rube Parnham, P, 1916-1917 Jeff Parrett, P ...
Ornithology (composition)
... "Ornithology" is a jazz standard by bebop alto saxophonist Charlie Parker and trumpeter Benny Harris ... Its title is a reference to Parker's nickname, "Bird" ... The Charlie Parker Septet made the first recording of the tune on March 28, 1946 on the Dial label, and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1989 ...

Famous quotes containing the word parker:

    ... if this world were anything near what it should be there would be no more need of a Book Week than there would be a of a Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.
    —Dorothy Parker (1893–1967)

    Those who have mastered etiquette, who are entirely, impeccably right, would seem to arrive at a point of exquisite dullness.
    —Dorothy Parker (1893–1967)

    As one delves deeper and deeper into Etiquette, disquieting thoughts come. That old Is- It-Worth-It Blues starts up again softly, perhaps, but plainly. Those who have mastered etiquette, who are entirely, impeccably right, would seem to arrive at a point of exquisite dullness. The letters and the conversations of the correct, as quoted by Mrs. Post, seem scarcely worth the striving for. The rules for finding topics of conversation fall damply on the spirit.
    —Dorothy Parker (1893–1967)