Parallel

Parallel may refer to:

Read more about Parallel:  Mathematics and Science, Music and Entertainment, Other Uses

Other articles related to "parallel":

Atoroidal
... A 3-manifold is (geometrically) atoroidal if it does not contain an embedded, non-boundary parallel, incompressible torus ... hold It does not contain an embedded, non-boundary parallel, incompressible torus ... meaning that it does not contain a properly embedded, non-boundary parallel, incompressible annulus ...
Boundary Parallel
... a closed n-manifold N embedded in an (n + 1)-manifold M is boundary parallel (or ∂-parallel, or peripheral) if there is an isotopy of N onto a boundary ...
Parallel - Other Uses
... Avenida del Paralelo, one of the main streets of Barcelona Parallel cousin Parallelism (grammar), a balance of two or more similar words, phrases, or clauses Parallelism (rhetoric). ...
Net CDF - Parallel-NetCDF
... An extension of netCDF for parallel computing called Parallel-NetCDF (or PnetCDF) has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Northwestern University ... the high-level netCDF data structures, the Parallel-NetCDF libraries can make use of optimizations to efficiently distribute the file read and write applications between multiple processors ... The Parallel-NetCDF package can read/write only classic and 64-bit offset formats ...
Todorokite - Appearance
... The crystals are flattened parallel to the plane containing the a and c crystal axes, and elongated parallel to the c axis ... and romanèchite groups also have fibrous or acicular habits and two perfect cleavages parallel to the fiber axis ...

Famous quotes containing the word parallel:

    There isn’t a Parallel of Latitude but thinks it would have been the Equator if it had had its rights.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    The parallel between antifeminism and race prejudice is striking. The same underlying motives appear to be at work, namely fear, jealousy, feelings of insecurity, fear of economic competition, guilt feelings, and the like. Many of the leaders of the feminist movement in the nineteenth-century United States clearly understood the similarity of the motives at work in antifeminism and race discrimination and associated themselves with the anti slavery movement.
    Ashley Montagu (b. 1905)

    One writes of scars healed, a loose parallel to the pathology of the skin, but there is no such thing in the life of an individual. There are open wounds, shrunk sometimes to the size of a pin-prick but wounds still. The marks of suffering are more comparable to the loss of a finger, or the sight of an eye. We may not miss them, either, for one minute in a year, but if we should there is nothing to be done about it.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)