Paid

  • (adj): Marked by the reception of pay.
    Example: "Paid work"; "a paid official"; "a paid announcement"; "a paid check"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on paid:

Salary - History - Payment During The Commercial Revolution
... not have been salaried, but, to the extent they were paid as employees, probably paid an hourly or daily wage or paid per unit produced (also called piece work) ...
OST-Arbeiter - History - Conditions
... large companies, and special camps guarded by privately paid police services known as the Werkschutz ... viewed these former Soviet civilian workers as "civilian prisoners", treated them accordingly, and paid no wages at all to them ... Those who were paid were paid with specially printed paper money and savings stamps, which could only be used toward the purchase of a limited number of items in special camp ...
Management Buyout - Financing - Seller Financing
... The price paid at the time of sale will be nominal, with the real price being paid over the following years out of the profits of the company ... will be left in control of the company once the consideration has been paid ...
Ransom
... the island of Pharmacusa, and held until someone paid 50 talents to free him ... to the poll tax of a half shekel to be paid by every male above twenty years at the census ... West Germany paid over 3.4 billion DM – nearly $2.3 billion at 1990 prices – in goods and hard currency ...
2008 Belmont Stakes - Payout
7.60 9 (DH) Ready's Echo 6.20 $2 Exacta (6-4) Paid $659.00 $2 Trifecta (6-4-8) Paid $3,703.00 $2 Trifecta (6-4-9) Paid $3,954.00 $2 Superfecta (6-4-8-9) Paid $48,637.00 $2 Superfecta (6-4-9-8 ...

More definitions of "paid":

  • (adj): Involving gainful employment in something often done as a hobby.
    Synonyms: nonrecreational

Famous quotes containing the word paid:

    The paid wealth which hundreds in the community acquire in trade, or by the incessant expansions of our population and arts, enchants the eyes of all the rest; the luck of one is the hope of thousands, and the bribe acts like the neighborhood of a gold mine to impoverish the farm, the school, the church, the house, and the very body and feature of man.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    We have heard all of our lives how, after the Civil War was over, the South went back to straighten itself out and make a living again. It was for many years a voiceless part of the government. The balance of power moved away from it—to the north and the east. The problems of the north and the east became the big problem of the country and nobody paid much attention to the economic unbalance the South had left as its only choice.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    Man will never be enslaved by machinery if the man tending the machine be paid enough.
    Karel Capek (1890–1938)