Oxford Latin Dictionary

The Oxford Latin Dictionary (or OLD) is the standard lexicon of Classical Latin, completed in 1982.

The dictionary professes to be "independent alike of Lewis & Short on the one hand and of the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae on the other." It "is based on an entirely fresh reading of the Latin sources. It follows, generally speaking, the principles of the Oxford English Dictionary, and its formal layout of articles is similar." (p. v).

Read more about Oxford Latin Dictionary:  History, Comparison With Other Dictionaries, See Also

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Oxford Latin Dictionary - See Also
... A Latin Dictionary Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources William Whitaker's Words ...

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