Oxford Latin Dictionary

The Oxford Latin Dictionary (or OLD) is the standard lexicon of Classical Latin, completed in 1982.

The dictionary professes to be "independent alike of Lewis & Short on the one hand and of the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae on the other." It "is based on an entirely fresh reading of the Latin sources. It follows, generally speaking, the principles of the Oxford English Dictionary, and its formal layout of articles is similar." (p. v).

Read more about Oxford Latin Dictionary:  History, Comparison With Other Dictionaries, See Also

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Oxford Latin Dictionary - See Also
... A Latin Dictionary Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources William Whitaker's Words ...

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    If someday I make a dictionary of definitions wanting single words to head them, a cherished entry will be “To abridge, expand, or otherwise alter or cause to be altered for the sake of belated improvement, one’s own writings in translation.”
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)

    The logical English train a scholar as they train an engineer. Oxford is Greek factory, as Wilton mills weave carpet, and Sheffield grinds steel. They know the use of a tutor, as they know the use of a horse; and they draw the greatest amount of benefit from both. The reading men are kept by hard walking, hard riding, and measured eating and drinking, at the top of their condition, and two days before the examination, do not work but lounge, ride, or run, to be fresh on the college doomsday.
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    Whither goest thou?
    Bible: New Testament Peter, in John, 13:36.

    The words, which are repeated in John 16:5, are best known in the Latin form in which they appear in the Vulgate: Quo vadis? Jesus replies, “Whither I go, thou canst not follow me now; but thou shalt follow me afterwards.”