Outline of Classical Studies

Outline Of Classical Studies

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to classical studies:

Classical studies (Classics for short) – earliest branch of the Humanities, which covers the languages, literature, history, art, and other cultural aspects of the ancient Mediterranean world. The field focuses primarily on, but is not limited to, Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome during classical antiquity, the era spanning from the beginning of the Bronze Age of Ancient Greece in 1000 BCE through the period known as Late Antiquity to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, circa 500 CE. The word classics is also used to refer to the literature of the period.

Read more about Outline Of Classical StudiesEssence of Classical Studies, Branches of Classical Studies, History of Classical Studies, General Classical Studies Concepts, Classical History, Classical Philosophy, Classical Religion and Mythology, Classical Studies Scholars, Classics-related Lists, See Also

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Outline Of Classical Studies - See Also
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