Outline of Classical Studies

Outline Of Classical Studies

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to classical studies:

Classical studies (Classics for short) – earliest branch of the Humanities, which covers the languages, literature, history, art, and other cultural aspects of the ancient Mediterranean world. The field focuses primarily on, but is not limited to, Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome during classical antiquity, the era spanning from the beginning of the Bronze Age of Ancient Greece in 1000 BCE through the period known as Late Antiquity to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, circa 500 CE. The word classics is also used to refer to the literature of the period.

Read more about Outline Of Classical StudiesEssence of Classical Studies, Branches of Classical Studies, History of Classical Studies, General Classical Studies Concepts, Classical History, Classical Philosophy, Classical Religion and Mythology, Classical Studies Scholars, Classics-related Lists, See Also

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Famous quotes containing the words outline of, studies, outline and/or classical:

    It is the business of thought to define things, to find the boundaries; thought, indeed, is a ceaseless process of definition. It is the business of Art to give things shape. Anyone who takes no delight in the firm outline of an object, or in its essential character, has no artistic sense.... He cannot even be nourished by Art. Like Ephraim, he feeds upon the East wind, which has no boundaries.
    Vance Palmer (1885–1959)

    His life itself passes deeper in nature than the studies of the naturalist penetrate; himself a subject for the naturalist. The latter raises the moss and bark gently with his knife in search of insects; the former lays open logs to their core with his axe, and moss and bark fly far and wide. He gets his living by barking trees. Such a man has some right to fish, and I love to see nature carried out in him.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The outline of the city became frantic in its effort to explain something that defied meaning. Power seemed to have outgrown its servitude and to have asserted its freedom. The cylinder had exploded, and thrown great masses of stone and steam against the sky.
    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)

    Culture is a sham if it is only a sort of Gothic front put on an iron building—like Tower Bridge—or a classical front put on a steel frame—like the Daily Telegraph building in Fleet Street. Culture, if it is to be a real thing and a holy thing, must be the product of what we actually do for a living—not something added, like sugar on a pill.
    Eric Gill (1882–1940)