Order of Battle of The Waterloo Campaign - French Army Order of Battle - IV Cavalry Reserve Corps

IV Cavalry Reserve Corps

Unit Commander Complement Officers Other Ranks
IV Cavalry Corps Général de Division Comte Edouard Jean Baptiste Milhaud 2,982, 12 guns 260 2,722
13th Cavalry Division Général de Division Wathier 1,318 125 1,193
1st Brigade Général de Brigade Baron Dubois 800 74 726
1er Régiment de Cuirassiers Colonel Comte Ordener 485 43 442
4e Régiment de Cuirassiers Colonel Habert 314 30 284
2nd Brigade Général de Brigade Travers, Baron de Jever 439 47 392
7e Régiment de Cuirassiers Colonel Richardot 180 22 158
12e Régiment de Cuirassiers Colonel Thurot 258 24 234
Division Artillerie 78 4x6lb guns & 2x5.5in howitzers 3 75
5e Companie 1er d’Artillerie à Cheval Capitaine Duchet 78 4x6lb guns & 2x5.5in howitzers 3 75
14th Cavalry Division Général de Division Baron Jacques Antoine Adrien Delort 1,663 134 1,529
1st Brigade Général de Brigade Baron Farine du Creux 878 72 806
5e Régiment de Cuirassiers Colonel Baron Gobert 518 39 479
10e Régiment de Cuirassiers Colonel Baron Lahuberdière 359 32 327
2nd Brigade Général de Brigade Baron Vial 698 57 641
6e Régiment de Cuirassiers Colonel Martin 285 22 263
9e Régiment de Cuirassiers Colonel Bigarne 412 34 378
Division Artillerie 78 4x6lb guns & 2x5.5in howitzers 3 75
4e Companie 3e d’Artillerie à Cheval Capitaine Legay 86 4x6lb guns & 2x5.5in howitzers 4 82

Read more about this topic:  Order Of Battle Of The Waterloo Campaign, French Army Order of Battle

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