On The Tendency of Species To Form Varieties; and On The Perpetuation of Varieties and Species By

On The Tendency Of Species To Form Varieties; And On The Perpetuation Of Varieties And Species By

On the Tendency of Species to form Varieties; and on the Perpetuation of Varieties and Species by Natural Means of Selection is the title of a joint presentation of two scientific papers to the Linnean Society of London on 1 July 1858; On The Tendency of Varieties to Depart Indefinitely from the Original Type by Alfred Russel Wallace and an Extract from an unpublished Work on Species from Charles Darwin's Essay of 1844, together with an Abstract of a Letter from Darwin to Asa Gray. This was the first announcement of the Darwin – Wallace theory of evolution by natural selection; the papers appeared in print on 20 August 1858. The presentation of the papers spurred Darwin to write a condensed "abstract" of his "big book" on Natural Selection. The abstract was published in November 1859 as On the Origin of Species.

Read more about On The Tendency Of Species To Form Varieties; And On The Perpetuation Of Varieties And Species By:  Events Leading Up To The Publication, The Reading, The Paper, Impact of The Publication, As An Influence On Cybernetics

Famous quotes containing the words perpetuation, varieties, form, tendency and/or species:

    The power of perpetuating our property in our families is one of the most valuable and interesting circumstances belonging to it, and that which tends the most to the perpetuation of society itself.
    Edmund Burke (1729–1797)

    Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; and there are varieties of services, but the same Lord; and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who activates all of them in everyone.
    Bible: New Testament, 1 Corinthians 12:4-6.

    In many places the road was in that condition called repaired, having just been whittled into the required semicylindrical form with the shovel and scraper, with all the softest inequalities in the middle, like a hog’s back with the bristles up.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    When any relationship is characterized by difference, particularly a disparity in power, there remains a tendency to model it on the parent-child-relationship. Even protectiveness and benevolence toward the poor, toward minorities, and especially toward women have involved equating them with children.
    Mary Catherine Bateson (20th century)

    Under the species of Syndicalism and Fascism there appears for the first time in Europe a type of man who does not want to give reasons or to be right, but simply shows himself resolved to impose his opinions.
    José Ortega Y Gasset (1883–1955)