Olympic Games - Champions and Medalists

Champions and Medalists

Further information: Lists of Olympic medalists and List of multiple Olympic gold medalists

The athletes or teams who place first, second, or third in each event receive medals. The winners receive gold medals, which were solid gold until 1912, then made of gilded silver and now gold-plated silver. Every gold medal however must contain at least six grams of pure gold. The runners-up receive silver medals and the third-place athletes are awarded bronze medals. In events contested by a single-elimination tournament (most notably boxing), third place might not be determined and both semifinal losers receive bronze medals. At the 1896 Olympics only the first two received a medal; silver for first and bronze for second. The current three-medal format was introduced at the 1904 Olympics. From 1948 onward athletes placing fourth, fifth, and sixth have received certificates, which became officially known as victory diplomas; in 1984 victory diplomas for seventh- and eighth-place finishers were added. At the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, the gold, silver, and bronze medal winners were also given olive wreaths. The IOC does not keep statistics of medals won, but National Olympic Committees and the media record medal statistics as a measure of success.

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Other articles related to "champions and medalists, champion":

Finland Volleyball League - Champions and Medalists
... Year Champion Silver Bronze 1957 Porin Pyrintö Helsingin Tarmo Järvensivun Kisa, Tampere 1958 Järvensivun Kisa Helsingin Tarmo Porin Pyrintö 1959 Järvensivun Kisa ...

Famous quotes containing the words champions and and/or champions:

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    Did all the lets and bars appear
    To every just or larger end,
    Whence should come the trust and cheer?
    Youth must its ignorant impulse lend—
    Age finds place in the rear.
    All wars are boyish, and are fought by boys,
    The champions and enthusiasts of the state:
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)