Office of The United Nations High Commissioner For Human Rights

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) is a United Nations agency that works to promote and protect the human rights that are guaranteed under international law and stipulated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948. The office was established by the UN General Assembly on 20 December 1993 in the wake of the 1993 World Conference on Human Rights.

The office is headed by the High Commissioner for Human Rights, who co-ordinates human rights activities throughout the UN System and supervises the Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland. The current High Commissioner is South African lawyer Navanethem Pillay, whose four-year term began on 1 September 2008.

As of 2008, the agency had a budget of US$120m and 1,000 employees based in Geneva. It is an Ex-Officio member of the Committee of the United Nations Development Group.

Read more about Office Of The United Nations High Commissioner For Human Rights:  High Commissioners For Human Rights

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Office Of The United Nations High Commissioner For Human Rights - High Commissioners For Human Rights
... United Nations High Commissioners for Human Rights Name Country Term Notes José Ayala-Lasso Ecuador 1994–1997 Mary Robinson Ireland 1997–2002 Term was not renewed by then ... The United States reportedly resisted her appointment at first, because of her views on abortion and other issues, but eventually dropped its opposition ... Campaign group avaaz.org had also run a high profile campaign calling for greater transparency in the appointment, including a blog site and a spoof job ...

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