Office For Civil Rights

The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is a sub-agency of the U.S. Department of Education that is primarily focused on protecting civil rights in Federally assisted education programs and prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, handicap, age, or membership in patriotic youth organizations.

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Other articles related to "office for civil rights, for civil rights, civil rights":

Office For Civil Rights - Leadership
... The United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Civil Rights is the head of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) of the United States Department of Education ... The Assistant Secretary is also the primary civil rights advisor to the United States Secretary of Education ... Currently, the Acting Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights is Seth Galanter (December, 2012-present) ...

Famous quotes containing the words civil rights, rights, office and/or civil:

    ...I was confronted with a virile idealism, an awareness of what man must have for manliness, dignity, and inner liberty which, by contrast, made me see how easy living had made my own group into childishly unthinking people. The Negro’s struggles and despairs have been like fertilizer in the fields of his humanity, while we, like protected children with all our basic needs supplied, have given our attention to superficialities.
    Sarah Patton Boyle, U.S. civil rights activist and author. The Desegregated Heart, part 1, ch. 19 (1962)

    Democracy and Republicanism in their best partisan utterances alike declare for human rights. Jefferson, the father of Democracy, Lincoln, the embodiment of Republicanism, and the Divine author of the religion on which true civilization rests, all proclaim the equal rights of all men.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    If suffering brought wisdom, the dentist’s office would be full of luminous ideas.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)

    One of the greatest difficulties in civil war is, that more art is required to know what should be concealed from our friends, than what ought to be done against our enemies.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)