Odysseas Elytis - Reference Works

Reference Works

  • Mario Vitti: Odysseus Elytis. Literature 1935–1971 (Icaros 1977)
  • Tasos Lignadis: Elytis' Axion Esti (1972)
  • Lili Zografos: Elytis – The Sun Drinker (1972); as well as the special issue of the American magazine Books Abroad dedicated to the work of Elytis (Autumn 1975. Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A.)
  • Odysseas Elytis: Analogies of Light. Ed. I. Ivask (1981)
  • A. Decavalles: Maria Nefeli and the Changeful Sameness of Elytis' Variations on a theme (1982)
  • E. Keeley: Elytis and the Greek Tradition (1983)
  • Ph. Sherrard: 'Odysseus Elytis and the Discovery of Greece', in Journal of Modern Greek Studies, 1(2), 1983
  • K. Malkoff: 'Eliot and Elytis: Poet of Time, Poet of Space', in Comparative Literature, 36(3), 1984
  • A. Decavalles: 'Odysseus Elytis in the 1980s', in World Literature Today, 62(l), 1988

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National And University Library Of Iceland - Collections - Reference Section
... The reference section of the library contains reference works, manuals, encyclopedias, dictionaries and bibliographic registries etc ... Within the reference section there are also computers for consulting the OPAC and for general use by guests ... University of Iceland, they have access to all electronic reference works that the university subscribes to in addition to the library subscriptions ...

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