Nuclear Waste Management Organization (Canada)

Nuclear Waste Management Organization (Canada)

The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) of Canada was established in 2002 under the Nuclear Fuel Waste Act (NFWA) to investigate approaches for managing Canada’s used nuclear fuel. Currently, nuclear power plants are operating in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick.

The Act required Canadian electricity generating companies which produce used nuclear fuel to establish a waste management organization to provide recommendations to the Government of Canada on the long-term management of used nuclear fuel. The legislation also required the waste owners to establish segregated trust funds to finance the long term management of the used fuel. The Act further authorized the Government of Canada to decide on the approach. The government’s choice will then be implemented by the NWMO, subject to all of the necessary regulatory approvals.

Read more about Nuclear Waste Management Organization (Canada):  Adaptive Phased Management Approach, Site Selection Process Design, Expressions of Interest

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Nuclear Waste Management Organization (Canada) - Expressions of Interest
... In May, the NMWO called for communities across Canadato submit "expressions of interest" to host a wastemanagement site ...

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