Nuclear Fuel - Metal Fuel

Metal Fuel

Metal fuels have the advantage of a much higher heat conductivity than oxide fuels but cannot survive equally high temperatures. Metal fuels have a long history of use, stretching from the Clementine reactor in 1946 to many test and research reactors. Metal fuels have the potential for the highest fissile atom density. Metal fuels are normally alloyed, but some metal fuels have been made with pure uranium metal. Uranium alloys that have been used include uranium aluminum, uranium zirconium, uranium silicon, uranium molybdenum, and uranium zirconium hydride. Any of the aforementioned fuels can be made with plutonium and other actinides as part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Metal fuels have been used in water reactors and liquid metal fast breeder reactors, such as EBR-II.

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Other articles related to "metal fuel, fuel, metal":

Nuclear Fuel - Metal Fuel - Actinide Fuel
... produced by neutron capture of uranium and plutonium can be used as fuel ... Metal actinide fuel is typically an alloy of zirconium, uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides ... It can be made inherently safe as thermal expansion of the metal alloy will increase neutron leakage ...

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