North Georgia College & State University

North Georgia College & State University

North Georgia College & State University (NGCSU) is a four-year public university located in Dahlonega, Lumpkin County, Georgia. Founded as North Georgia Agricultural College in 1873, it is the second oldest co-educational institution in the state. The university is renowned for its ROTC program, and is designated as The Military College of Georgia. It is also designated by the University System of Georgia as a state leadership institution. It is one of only six senior military colleges in the United States.

On January 10, 2012, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia approved the merger of the school with Gainesville State College by January 2013. The new combined school will be known as the University of North Georgia. It is not anticipated that any of either schools' current campuses will close.

The institution was founded as an agricultural branch of the University of Georgia in 1873, which was made possible by the Morrill Act and the efforts of William Pierce Price. Its first graduating class in 1879 consisted of three men and one woman, making it the first college in the state to award a degree to a woman. In 1929, its agriculture program was dropped and the name was changed to North Georgia College. The school received the designation of state university in 1996. Protesting alumni were successful in keeping the word college in the name after they became upset when the name North Georgia State University was suggested.

North Georgia's campus is nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains just south of the terminus of the Appalachian Trail. Campus buildings are located around the drill field which is used by the military for drill and training, recreation for students and intramural sports. As a sign of respect students do not take short cuts across the field from the dorms and barracks to the academic buildings. The main administrative building, Price Memorial Hall, is named in honor of founder William Pierce Price. It is built on the foundations of the mint that was established in Dahlonega during the gold rush. Its spire was gold leafed in 1973 from local gold as was the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta.

The university consists of 4 colleges and awards over 50 degrees including in teacher education, nursing, pre-med, and military programs. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked the university 53rd in the "Regional University (South)" category. G.I. Jobs magazine listed the university as a 2013 "Military Friendly School".

Read more about North Georgia College & State UniversityHistory, Student Life, Campus, "The Boar's Head Brigade"

Famous quotes containing the words university, state, north, georgia and/or college:

    I am not willing to be drawn further into the toils. I cannot accede to the acceptance of gifts upon terms which take the educational policy of the university out of the hands of the Trustees and Faculty and permit it to be determined by those who give money.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)

    I can never suppose this country so far lost to all ideas of self-importance as to be willing to grant America independence; if that could ever be adopted I shall despair of this country being ever preserved from a state of inferiority and consequently falling into a very low class among the European States.
    George III (1738–1820)

    Come see the north wind’s masonry.
    Out of an unseen quarry evermore
    Furnished with tile, the fierce artificer
    Curves his white bastions with projected roof
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Georgia, Georgia, no peace I find, just an old sweet song keeps Georgia on my mind.
    Stuart Gorrell (d. 1963)

    Thirty-five years ago, when I was a college student, people wrote letters. The businessman who read, the lawyer who traveled; the dressmaker in evening school, my unhappy mother, our expectant neighbor: all conducted an often large and varied correspondence. It was the accustomed way of ordinarily educated people to occupy the world beyond their own small and immediate lives.
    Vivian Gornick (b. 1935)