North American P-51 Variants

North American P-51 Variants

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used by Allied air forces during World War II, the Korean War and in several other conflicts. During World War II Mustang pilots claimed 4,950 enemy aircraft shot down, second only to the Grumman F6F Hellcat.

The P-51 was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation (NAA), under the direction of lead engineer Edgar Schmued, in response to a specification issued directly to NAA by the British Purchasing Commission; the prototype NA-73X airframe was rolled out on 9 September 1940, albeit without an engine, 102 days after the contract was signed and it was first flown on 26 October. The Mustang was originally designed to use a low-altitude rated Allison V-1710 engine, and was first flown operationally by the Royal Air Force (RAF) as a tactical-reconnaissance aircraft and fighter-bomber. The definitive version, the P-51D, was powered by the Packard V-1650-7, a licence-built version of the Rolls-Royce Merlin 60 series two-stage two-speed supercharged engine, and armed with six .50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns. This article covers the various variants of the P-51.

Read more about North American P-51 Variants:  Experimental Mustangs, Summary of P-51 Variants, P-51 Mustang Dimensions, Performance and Armament, Table of P-51 Dimensions, Performance and Armament

Other related articles:

North American P-51 Variants - Table of P-51 Dimensions, Performance and Armament
... Allison V-1710-87 Allison V-1710-81 Packard Merlin V-1650-3 (P-51-B-1NA to -5NA P-51-C-1NT Packard Merlin V-1650-7 Power 1,220 hp (909 kW) at 10,000 ft (3,048 m) (4 ...

Famous quotes containing the words north american, variants, north and/or american:

    We might hypothetically possess ourselves of every technological resource on the North American continent, but as long as our language is inadequate, our vision remains formless, our thinking and feeling are still running in the old cycles, our process may be “revolutionary” but not transformative.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    Nationalist pride, like other variants of pride, can be a substitute for self-respect.
    Eric Hoffer (1902–1983)

    Exporting Church employees to Latin America masks a universal and unconscious fear of a new Church. North and South American authorities, differently motivated but equally fearful, become accomplices in maintaining a clerical and irrelevant Church. Sacralizing employees and property, this Church becomes progressively more blind to the possibilities of sacralizing person and community.
    Ivan Illich (b. 1926)

    The Afro-American experience is the only real culture that America has. Basically, every American tries to walk, talk, dress and behave like African Americans.
    Hugh Masakela (b. 1939)