North American P-51 Variants

North American P-51 Variants

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used by Allied air forces during World War II, the Korean War and in several other conflicts. During World War II Mustang pilots claimed 4,950 enemy aircraft shot down, second only to the Grumman F6F Hellcat.

The P-51 was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation (NAA), under the direction of lead engineer Edgar Schmued, in response to a specification issued directly to NAA by the British Purchasing Commission; the prototype NA-73X airframe was rolled out on 9 September 1940, albeit without an engine, 102 days after the contract was signed and it was first flown on 26 October. The Mustang was originally designed to use a low-altitude rated Allison V-1710 engine, and was first flown operationally by the Royal Air Force (RAF) as a tactical-reconnaissance aircraft and fighter-bomber. The definitive version, the P-51D, was powered by the Packard V-1650-7, a licence-built version of the Rolls-Royce Merlin 60 series two-stage two-speed supercharged engine, and armed with six .50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns. This article covers the various variants of the P-51.

Read more about North American P-51 Variants:  Experimental Mustangs, Summary of P-51 Variants, P-51 Mustang Dimensions, Performance and Armament, Table of P-51 Dimensions, Performance and Armament

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North American P-51 Variants - Table of P-51 Dimensions, Performance and Armament
... Allison V-1710-87 Allison V-1710-81 Packard Merlin V-1650-3 (P-51-B-1NA to -5NA P-51-C-1NT Packard Merlin V-1650-7 Power 1,220 hp (909 kW) at 10,000 ft (3,048 m) (4 ...

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