North American P-51 Variants

North American P-51 Variants

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used by Allied air forces during World War II, the Korean War and in several other conflicts. During World War II Mustang pilots claimed 4,950 enemy aircraft shot down, second only to the Grumman F6F Hellcat.

The P-51 was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation (NAA), under the direction of lead engineer Edgar Schmued, in response to a specification issued directly to NAA by the British Purchasing Commission; the prototype NA-73X airframe was rolled out on 9 September 1940, albeit without an engine, 102 days after the contract was signed and it was first flown on 26 October. The Mustang was originally designed to use a low-altitude rated Allison V-1710 engine, and was first flown operationally by the Royal Air Force (RAF) as a tactical-reconnaissance aircraft and fighter-bomber. The definitive version, the P-51D, was powered by the Packard V-1650-7, a licence-built version of the Rolls-Royce Merlin 60 series two-stage two-speed supercharged engine, and armed with six .50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns. This article covers the various variants of the P-51.

Read more about North American P-51 Variants:  Experimental Mustangs, Summary of P-51 Variants, P-51 Mustang Dimensions, Performance and Armament, Table of P-51 Dimensions, Performance and Armament

Other related articles:

North American P-51 Variants - Table of P-51 Dimensions, Performance and Armament
... V-1710-87 Allison V-1710-81 Packard Merlin V-1650-3 (P-51-B-1NA to -5NA P-51-C-1NT Packard Merlin V-1650-7 Power 1,220 hp (909 kW) at 10,000 ft (3,048 m) (44.7" Hg, 3,000 rpm) 1,325 hp (988 kW) at 5,400 ft (1,646 m ...

Famous quotes containing the words north american, variants, north and/or american:

    The North American system only wants to consider the positive aspects of reality. Men and women are subjected from childhood to an inexorable process of adaptation; certain principles, contained in brief formulas are endlessly repeated by the press, the radio, the churches, and the schools, and by those kindly, sinister beings, the North American mothers and wives. A person imprisoned by these schemes is like a plant in a flowerpot too small for it: he cannot grow or mature.
    Octavio Paz (b. 1914)

    Nationalist pride, like other variants of pride, can be a substitute for self-respect.
    Eric Hoffer (1902–1983)

    The North will at least preserve your flesh for you; Northerners are pale for good and all. There’s very little difference between a dead Swede and a young man who’s had a bad night. But the Colonial is full of maggots the day after he gets off the boat.
    Louis-Ferdinand Céline (1894–1961)

    I ... observed the great beauty of American government to be, that the simple machines of representation, carried through all its parts, gives facility for a being moulded at will to fit with the knowledge of the age; that thus, although it should be imperfect in any or all of its parts, it bears within it a perfect principle the principle of improvement.

    Frances Wright (1795–1852)