Negro

The wordNegro” is used in the English-speaking world to refer to a person of black ancestry or appearance. The word negro denotes 'black' in the Spanish and Portuguese, derived from the ancient Latin word, niger, 'black', which itself ultimately is probably from a Proto-Indo-European root *nekw-, 'to be dark', akin to *nokw- 'night'.

"Negro" superseded "colored" as the most polite terminology, at a time when "black" was more offensive. This usage was accepted as normal, even by people classified as Negroes, until the later Civil Rights movement in the late 1960s. One well-known example is the identification by Martin Luther King, Jr. of his own race as 'Negro' in his famous 1963 speech I Have a Dream.

During the American Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, some black American leaders in the United States, notably Malcolm X, objected to the word, preferring Black, because they associated the word Negro with the long history of slavery, segregation, and discrimination that treated African Americans as second class citizens, or worse.

Since the late 1960s, various other terms have been more widespread in popular usage. These include "black", "Black African", "Afro-American" (in use from the late 1960s to 1990) and "African American" (used in the United States to refer to black Americans, peoples often referred to in the past as American Negroes).

The term "Negro" is still used in some historical contexts, such as in the name of the United Negro College Fund and the Negro league in sports.

The United States Census Bureau announced that "Negro" would be included on the 2010 United States Census, alongside "Black" and "African-American" because some older black Americans still self-identify with the term.

Read more about Negro:  In English, In Other Languages, See Also

Other articles related to "negro":

Message To The Grass Roots - Contents
1 The speech 1.1 A common enemy 1.2 The Black revolution and the Negro revolution 1.3 The house Negro and the field Negro 1.4 The March on Washington 2 Analysis 3 Legacy 4 Key excerpts 5 References 6 Sources 7 ...
Sur (film) - Plot
... A friend, "El-Negro", who was killed during the miliary coup, appears in the night with a special mission to help Floreal face what has happened when he was serving time ... El-Negro helps him to live through the important events that happened in his absence ... El-Negro helps him get past his anger, understanding how hard it was to endure such a difficult time and how the military coup had crushed people's lives ...
Negro - See Also
... Negroid Zanj Human skin color Race (classification of human beings) Free Negro Creole Mulatto Quadroon Coloured, Colored Nigger Euphemism treadmill Kaffer ...
Marcus Bruce Christian
... Marcus Bruce Christian (March 8, 1900 - November 21, 1976), was a New Negro regional poet, writer, historian and folklorist ... manuscript, The History of The Negro in Louisiana during his stint at the Negro Federal Writers Project at Dillard University ...
Minneapolis Keystones
... While the Negro National League was not formed until 1920, the Keystones did have many top notch players, and at least one of them, Hurley McNair would go on to play with the Kansas ... researchers do not consider the Keystones a "formal" Negro League team ... Today, the Keystones are rarely mentioned in Negro baseball history, and stats and rosters are hard to find ...

Famous quotes containing the word negro:

    It is only when we speak what is right that we stand a chance at night of being blown to bits in our homes. Can we call this a free country, when I am afraid to go to sleep in my own home in Mississippi?... I might not live two hours after I get back home, but I want to be a part of setting the Negro free in Mississippi.
    Fannie Lou Hamer (1917–1977)

    There is great fear expressed on all sides lest this war shall be made a war for the negro. I am willing that it shall be. It is a war to found an empire on the negro in slavery, and shame on us if we do not make it a war to establish the negro in freedom—against whom the whole nation, North and South, East and West, in one mighty conspiracy, has combined from the beginning.
    Susan B. Anthony (1820–1906)

    Had she been worth the blood, the cramped cries, the little stuttering bravado,
    The gradual dulling of those Negro eyes,
    The sudden, overwhelming little-boyness in that barn?
    Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917)