Negro

The wordNegro” is used in the English-speaking world to refer to a person of black ancestry or appearance. The word negro denotes 'black' in the Spanish and Portuguese, derived from the ancient Latin word, niger, 'black', which itself ultimately is probably from a Proto-Indo-European root *nekw-, 'to be dark', akin to *nokw- 'night'.

"Negro" superseded "colored" as the most polite terminology, at a time when "black" was more offensive. This usage was accepted as normal, even by people classified as Negroes, until the later Civil Rights movement in the late 1960s. One well-known example is the identification by Martin Luther King, Jr. of his own race as 'Negro' in his famous 1963 speech I Have a Dream.

During the American Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, some black American leaders in the United States, notably Malcolm X, objected to the word, preferring Black, because they associated the word Negro with the long history of slavery, segregation, and discrimination that treated African Americans as second class citizens, or worse.

Since the late 1960s, various other terms have been more widespread in popular usage. These include "black", "Black African", "Afro-American" (in use from the late 1960s to 1990) and "African American" (used in the United States to refer to black Americans, peoples often referred to in the past as American Negroes).

The term "Negro" is still used in some historical contexts, such as in the name of the United Negro College Fund and the Negro league in sports.

The United States Census Bureau announced that "Negro" would be included on the 2010 United States Census, alongside "Black" and "African-American" because some older black Americans still self-identify with the term.

Read more about Negro:  In English, In Other Languages, See Also

Other articles related to "negro":

Minneapolis Keystones
... While the Negro National League was not formed until 1920, the Keystones did have many top notch players, and at least one of them, Hurley McNair would go on to play with the Kansas ... Many researchers do not consider the Keystones a "formal" Negro League team ... Today, the Keystones are rarely mentioned in Negro baseball history, and stats and rosters are hard to find ...
Sur (film) - Plot
... A friend, "El-Negro", who was killed during the miliary coup, appears in the night with a special mission to help Floreal face what has happened when he was serving time in prison ... El-Negro helps him to live through the important events that happened in his absence ... El-Negro helps him get past his anger, understanding how hard it was to endure such a difficult time and how the military coup had crushed people's lives ...
Marcus Bruce Christian
... Christian (March 8, 1900 - November 21, 1976), was a New Negro regional poet, writer, historian and folklorist ... Christian also compiled and wrote the still-unpublished manuscript, The History of The Negro in Louisiana during his stint at the Negro Federal Writers Project at ...
Message To The Grass Roots - Contents
1 The speech 1.1 A common enemy 1.2 The Black revolution and the Negro revolution 1.3 The house Negro and the field Negro 1.4 The March on Washington 2 Analysis 3 Legacy 4 ...
Negro - See Also
... people Negroid Zanj Human skin color Race (classification of human beings) Free Negro Creole Mulatto Quadroon Coloured, Colored Nigger Euphemism treadmill Kaffer ...

Famous quotes containing the word negro:

    And then, the negro being doomed, and damned, and forgotten, to everlasting bondage, is the white man quite certain that the tyrant demon will not turn upon him too?
    Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)

    A ‘spasm band’ is a miscellaneous collection of a soap box, tin cans, pan tops, nails, drumsticks, and little Negro boys. When mixed in the proper proportions this results in the wildest shuffle dancing, accompanied by a bumping rhythm.
    —For the City of New Orleans, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    I respect the ways of old folks, but the blood of a rooster or a goat cannot turn the seasons, change the course of the clouds and fill them up with water like bladders. The other night, at the ceremony for Legba, I danced and sang my fill: I am a black man, no? and I enjoyed it like a true Negro should. When the drums beat, I feel it in the pit of my stomach, I feel the itch in my hips and up and down my legs, I have got to join the party. But that is all.
    Jacques Roumain (1907–1945)